Where We Are Going Today: Pattis France

Updated 03 November 2018
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Where We Are Going Today: Pattis France

  • It is very French, with mint-blue striped walls, a massive chandelier and a Cinderella-inspired stairway leading to a second floor where a piano sat unoccupied

During a recent visit to the Eastern Province, while rediscovering a Saudi city I had not visited since I was nine, a colleague introduced me to a grandiose French cafe by Alkhobar waterfront, on Prince Turki Corniche Road.
I was rendered breathless the moment I stepped through the door of Pattis France and was greeted by an assortment of colorful and mouthwatering cakes and sweets on display. Too distracted to notice the kind waiter leading us to our table, I absent-mindedly followed, still eyeing every type of dessert imaginable.
When we reached our table I finally noticed the cafe’s interior design.
It is very French, with mint-blue striped walls, a massive chandelier and a Cinderella-inspired stairway leading to a second floor where a piano sat unoccupied.
I ordered an iced Spanish latte and a chicken wrap, and my companion and I later shared a saffron pancake adorned with caramelized pistachios and pismaniye, a Turkish delight akin to cotton candy.
You might think dessert sounds like a bad decision after such a meal, but the pancakes were the perfect mix of subtle sweetness and rich flavor, and were not too heavy — unlike the sea salt waffle dish I would have ordered had I followed my initial whims. All in all, Pattis France definitely served up an unforgettable treat.


Saudi home-bakers cooking up sweet business on internet

Nada Kutbi started baking from home for family and friends before setting up her Sucre De Nada pastry shop to expand her home business. (Photos/Supplied)
Updated 22 May 2019
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Saudi home-bakers cooking up sweet business on internet

  • Thanks to social media, business is booming for Jeddah’s cake and pastry makers

JEDDAH: Enterprising Saudi home-bakers have been turning to social media to help cook up some sweet business success.
The Kingdom’s food producers are proving to be some of the rising stars of the internet, and none more so than 53-year-old mom Nada Kutbi.
Her Sucre De Nada pastry shop in Jeddah has become one of the go-to places for homemade desserts and cakes, and the online side of her business is also booming.
Kutbi’s daughter, Nassiba Khashoggi, told Arab News: “She has basically been baking all her life, especially after having children. She used to make cookies for us and whenever she tried a dessert somewhere else, she would recreate it.
“In restaurants or gatherings, she would always analyze sweets and make them at home for her family. That was how she started baking.
“I don’t think she ever thought she could pursue it as a career, but everyone loved her baking and one of her closest friends encouraged her to start her business when she was a stay-at-home mom.
“It was in 2011-2012, and her friend basically forced her to start by telling her, ‘yallah! make a cake and I will buy it from you now.’”
Khashoggi added: “In the beginning we just went by word of mouth, but when Instagram came along, we made an account and started posting pictures and the customers loved her creativity and uniqueness. I don’t think many people knew what banoffee was before my mom promoted it.”
Although Kutbi’s unique takes and touches went down a treat with customers, it was not until Ramadan last year that she officially opened her bakery in Jeddah.
But stepping up from running a home business presented new challenges. “When you are running a home business there are few staff and it is easy to control,” said Khashoggi. But expanding requires you to put more trust in other people and that was difficult for my mom. Also, when we increased the number of our products it became harder to maintain the quality of goods.”
Kutbi aims to avoid storing, pre-baking or freezing her products and is not a fan of mass production and blast freezing, according to her daughter. “In short, she is against commercial baking,” said Khashoggi. “What is unique about my mom is that everything she makes is made the same day from scratch. It makes it harder for her to redo everything but that’s what makes her special.”

HIGHLIGHtS

• The Kingdom’s food producers are proving to be some of the rising stars of the internet, none more so than 53-year-old mom Nada Kutbi.

• Kutbi’s unique takes and touches have been a hit with customer, but it was not until Ramadan last year that she officially opened her bakery in Jeddah.

Sometimes customers even send pictures or pieces of dessert to Kutbi asking her to recreate their favorite foods.
Another Jeddah-based bakery thriving on the internet is Ganache. Run by Anas Khashoggi, 58, and Jamila Ali Islam, 48, the pastry business has been operating for almost 20 years.
Khashoggi supported his wife after spotting her talent for baking and took a leap of faith by giving up his job and starting an online bakery.
“At that time, there was no social media, but we made an introductory website, which helped us gain popularity,” he said. That was in 1996, and the couple’s first store opened later the same year.
“Ganache has its own unique spirit as a family business, and it is run by Saudi youth who are managing the bakery and understand the Saudi market. The family committee is the one that approves the products,” added Khashoggi.