The Six: The UAE’s wackiest world records

The largest flower arrangement in the world can be found in Dubai Miracle Garden in the shape of an Emirates Airline Airbus A380. (Shutterstock)
Updated 03 November 2018

The Six: The UAE’s wackiest world records

DUBAI: The UAE is no stranger to breaking world records, but these feats of ingenuity are on the stranger side.
Chain reaction
On Thursday, Dubai’s Roads and Transport Authority broke a Guinness World Record when commuters from 96 countries set a record for the longest human chain with the most diverse range of nationalities.
Nailed it
The Beauty Connection Spa in Dubai partnered with KOKO Nail to set a record for the most nails filed and varnished within eight hours in 2014.
Blooming brilliant
The largest flower arrangement in the world can be found in Dubai Miracle Garden in the shape of an Emirates Airline Airbus A380.
Record-breaking breakfast
In 2017, a Sikh temple in Dubai entered the Guinness World Records archive for serving free continental breakfasts to 600 people from 101 countries — the maximum number of people from diverse nationalities.
A tricky operation
In January 2014, the Dubai Health Authority broke a record for the largest gathering of people dressed as nurses with 691 attendees.
Light it up
A wood and copper lantern standing at 13.09 meters tall was named the largest standing lantern in the world in 2016 and is a permanent installation at a fresh food market in Sharjah.


Alaska man discovers 50-year-old message in bottle from Russian Navy

Updated 19 August 2019

Alaska man discovers 50-year-old message in bottle from Russian Navy

  • Then Russian Navy Capt. Anatolii Prokofievich Botsanenko wrote the letter when he was a 36-year-old aboard the Sulak
ANCHORAGE, Alaska: A man discovered a 50-year-old letter in a bottle from the Russian Navy on the shores of western Alaska.
Tyler Ivanoff found the handwritten Russian letter early this month while gathering firewood near Shishmaref about 600 miles (966 kilometers) northwest of Anchorage, television station KTUU reported.
“I was just looking for firewood when I found the bottle,” Tyler Ivanoff said. “When I found the bottle, I had to use a screwdriver to get the message out.”
Ivanoff shared his discovery on Facebook where Russian speakers translated the message to be a greeting from a Cold War Russian sailor dated June 20, 1969. The message included an address and a request for a response from the person who finds it.
Reporters from the state-owned Russian media network, Russia-1, tracked down the original writer, Capt. Anatolii Prokofievich Botsanenko, KTUU reported.
He was skeptical he wrote the note until he saw his signature on the bottom.
“There — exactly!” he exclaimed.
The message was sent while the then 36-year-old was aboard the Sulak, Botsanenko said. Botsanenko shed tears when the Russian television reporter told him the Sulak was sold for scrap in the 1990s.
Botsanenko also showed the reporter some souvenirs from his time on the ship, including the autograph of the wife of a famous Russian spy and Japanese liquor bottles, the latter kept over his wife’s protests.
Ivanoff’s discovery of the bottle was first reported by Nome radio station KNOM.