Houthi militia hold 16 cargo ships in Yemeni ports

In this Sept. 29, 2018, file photo, a cargo ship is docked at the port, in Hodeida, Yemen. (AP)
Updated 04 November 2018
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Houthi militia hold 16 cargo ships in Yemeni ports

  • The center added that there are 134 migrants and 293 sailors of Asian, European and African nationalities on the ships

JEDDAH: Sixteen ships carrying food and oil products are being held by Houthi militias in the Yemeni ports of Hodeidah and Salif, according to the Isnad Center for Comprehensive Humanitarian Operations in Yemen. Some of them have been held for more than a month, which might have damaged their cargo of wheat and flour, it added.
The center said that five ships carrying medicines, medical equipment, sugar and liquefied gas have been detained inside the port of Hodeidah, while eight ships carrying maize, soybeans, wheat, flour and liquefied gas are being held in the port’s Al-Mikhtaf area. A further three ships are detained inside the port of Salif, two of which were prevented from unloading their cargo of corn, wheat and soybeans.
The center added that there are 134 migrants and 293 sailors of Asian, European and African nationalities on the ships. The total tonnage of the captured vessels is 198,860.88 tons, and they are carrying 116,880 tons of wheat, corn, sugar and soybeans, 79,722 tons of medicine and medical equipment, and 119,022 tons of liquefied gas. The ships bear the flags of nine nations: Djibouti, Sierra Leone, Malta, Comoros, the Marshall Islands, Pelhams, Panama, Nigeria and Palau.


Yemeni spokesman says militants seek to ignite Hodeidah fighting

Updated 21 March 2019
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Yemeni spokesman says militants seek to ignite Hodeidah fighting

  • Renewed fighting in Hodeidah would risk severing the main passage for humanitarian aid
  • A senior Houthi member earlier said a withdrawal is “impossible”

CAIRO: Yemen’s militants are igniting more conflict by their refusal to give up control of the key port city of Hodeida, the focus of months of UN-brokered talks, a government spokesman said.
Renewed fighting in Hodeidah would risk severing the main passage for humanitarian aid to the rest of the country, including northern Yemen, a heartland of the Houthi militants.
Rageh Badi, spokesman for the internationally recognized Yemen government, denounced remarks by senior militant leader Mohammed Ali Al-Houthi who earlier this week told The Associated Press that the Saudi-led coalition, which backs the government side in the conflict, is trying to change the terms of the agreement struck last year in Sweden and that a militant withdrawal would therefore be “impossible.”
Badi told reporters at a press conference Wednesday in the southern city of Aden that such remarks could set off renewed fighting in Hodeidah, the key entry point for international aid to the war-torn country, and violate the tentative peace agreement reached by the two sides in Sweden.
The remarks are a “renunciation of the Hodeidah agreement and a declaration of war,” Badi said, urging the UN to step up pressure on the rebels to prevent another “explosion of the situation” in Hodeidah. Otherwise, renewed fighting is just a “few days” away, he added.