Pakistan, China sign 15 agreements on a range of bilateral issues

Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan, left, and China's Premier Li Keqiang attend a signing ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Saturday. (Reuters)
Updated 04 November 2018
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Pakistan, China sign 15 agreements on a range of bilateral issues

  • Islamabad reaffirms its support in combating terrorism
  • Both countries dismiss growing propaganda against CPEC

ISLAMABAD: With an aim to consolidate their strategic partnership and all-weather friendship, Pakistan and China signed 15 agreements on Sunday covering a range of bilateral issues, as part of Prime Minister Imran Khan’s first visit to the country, a joint statement said.

The statement added that building a closer China-Pakistan community in the new era was the pillar of the continued relationship between the “iron brothers.” 

Pakistan, on its part, reaffirmed its support in safeguarding China’s sovereignty and security, while enhancing cooperation against the “three evils” of extremism, terrorism and separatism, the statement said.

Dismissing the growing propaganda against the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) project, both Beijing and Islamabad expressed their determination to protect the initiative against all threats, while agreeing to speed up progress along the Gwadar port. “Both sides reviewed the early phase of the CPEC and reaffirmed their complete consensus on the future trajectory of CPEC, timely completion of on-going projects and joint efforts for realization of its full potential,” the statement added.

They also agreed to task the CPEC’s Joint Cooperation Committee (JCC) with formulating ideas to explore new areas of cooperation. “It was decided that the eighth session of the JCC will be held in Beijing before the end of the year. 

The two sides announced the setting up of a working group on socio-economic development, to assist with livelihood projects in Pakistan,” the statement added.

The two sides discussed ways to boost Pakistan’s industrial capacity through joint ventures, including steps to take concrete measures in addressing the trade imbalance. “These would include an exchange of trade missions, broadening market access for agricultural and ICT products, and simplifying customs, quarantine and phytosanitary procedures,” the statement said.

Pakistan and China acknowledged the need to conclude the second phase of the China-Pakistan Free Trade Agreement as early as possible and further enhance defense cooperation, maintain high-level visits and exchanges between relevant departments of the two countries’ armed forces,  while making full use of the China-Pakistan Defense and Security Consultation mechanism to deepen cooperation in military exercises and technology.

Islamabad applauded Beijing’s efforts in combating corruption with successful results, while expressing an interest to imbibe and apply similar practices in Pakistan as well. 

Acknowledging the fact that China was a popular choice for Pakistanis — with more than 25,000 students enrolled across universities in the country —  China, on its part, said that it would offer additional scholarships for students from the neighboring country. 

To facilitate this process, the two countries discussed methods to establish a committee to encourage youth exchange programs and ensure cooperation in the area. 

Additionally, they reaffirmed their commitment to uphold the purpose and principles of the UN Charter, in terms of promoting international peace and security and safeguarding the contemporary world order.

Khan is visiting China on the invitation of Prime Minister Li Keqiang. During his visit, he also called on President Xi Jinping and a coterie of other officials.


Indian minister steps up calls to deport illegal immigrants

Updated 12 min 19 sec ago
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Indian minister steps up calls to deport illegal immigrants

  • National Register of Citizenship will be extended across country, says Amit Shah

NEW DELHI: New Delhi will deport all illegal immigrants found in the country, Indian Home Minister Amit Shah told Parliament on Wednesday.

The warning signaled a heightening of a campaign that some critics say is “aimed at alienating the Muslim minority.”

The minister’s statement comes as the state of Assam is set to release its final list of the National Register of Citizenship (NRC), an exercise to identify illegal migrants from neighboring Bangladesh. The Supreme Court demanded that the NRC should submit its report at the end of this month.

Of the state’s 31 million residents, almost 4 million were missing from the NRC’s report last year. Most were poor Muslims. Illegal immigration was a core election issue for the ruling right-wing party Bhartiya Janata Party (BJP)

“The government will identify illegal immigrants living in every inch of the country’s soil and will deport them in line with international law,” said Shah.

He added that the NRC would be extended across the country. 

Shah, a Hindu hard-liner and the second most powerful figure in the Narendra Modi government, has been belligerently opposed to illegal Muslim immigrants, who he recently described as “termites.”

Critics have questioned the need for the NRC throughout the country.

The BJP does not want to clarify what it truly means because that is part of their politics, but the opposition leaders are also silent.

Hilal Ahmad, Academic

“This is a witch hunt of the minority under the false concern of illegal immigration,” said SubHajjit Naskar of Jadavpur University.

“The way the NRC is being implemented in Assam is damaging for our secular and democratic values.”

Naskar told Arab News: “The register is part of the broader majoritarian agenda to make India a Hindu state where minority Muslims will be treated as second class citizens.” 

Dr. Hilal Ahmad, associate professor at the Center for the Study of Developing Societies, said: “The substantial part of Shah’s statement is that NRC is not entirely about Muslims. It also claims that it’s an institutional process with legal support and it’s not at all concerned with Muslims.”

Ahmad added: “The BJP does not want to clarify what it truly means because that is part of their politics, but the opposition leaders are also silent. They are also trying to consolidate the impression that the NRC is anti-Muslim.”

Suhas Chakma, director of the Rights and Risks Analysis Group, said that “Shah’s plans are not practical.”

“How you are going to identify illegal migrants? Have you spoken to Bangladesh about the deportation? What the BJP government is trying to do is not implementable. It is a recipe for chaos,” said Chakma.

Sabber Ahmad, from the Rohingya Human Rights Initiative, a New Delhi-based group serving the persecuted minority community from Myanmar, said the “Indian government’s stance on illegal migrants creates panic among the small Rohingya community living here.”

“I fled Myanmar in 2012 and India gave me a new lease of life. New Dehli should show some humanity in dealing with people like us,” Ahmad told Arab News.

“India has a history of sheltering persecuted minorities from around the world. They must continue this proud tradition,” Ahmad added.