Iraq rejects US interference in domestic affairs

The embassy in Baghdad posted a message on Twitter on Tuesday saying Tehran must respect the sovereignty of the Iraqi government. (AFP)
Updated 04 November 2018
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Iraq rejects US interference in domestic affairs

BAGHDAD: Iraq’s Foreign Ministry rejected on Saturday what it called “US interference” in its affairs after the American embassy issued a statement telling neighboring Iran to respect Iraq’s sovereignty and allow demobilization of Shiite militias.
The embassy in Baghdad posted a message on Twitter on Tuesday saying Tehran must “respect the sovereignty of the Iraqi government and permit the disarming, demobilization, and reintegration” of Shiite militias.
It was one of several statements issued on the embassy’s Twitter account outlining US demands before new sanctions on Iran’s oil and financial sector take effect on Nov. 4.
Iraq’s Foreign Ministry said in a statement it “rejects interference in Iraq’s internal affairs, especially domestic security reform” and demanded the Twitter post be removed.
Iraq’s Shiite militias, which took part in a US-backed campaign to defeat Daesh, were formally included in the security forces this year. Some militias are backed by Iran and Washington wants them disarmed.
The US has said it would grant Baghdad a waiver on Iranian gas and energy imports that feed Iraqi power stations and vital food items, Iraqi officials said on Friday.


Lebanese town bans Muslims from buying, renting property

Updated 26 June 2019
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Lebanese town bans Muslims from buying, renting property

  • Lebanese Christian communities feel under siege as Muslims leave overcrowded areas
  • This comes against the backdrop of deep-rooted sectarian divisions that once erupted into a 15-year civil war

BEIRUT: The case of Hadat, a once-Christian Lebanese town that bars Muslims from buying or renting property, has sparked a national outcry.
It reflects the country’s rapidly changing demographic make-up against the backdrop of deep-rooted sectarian divisions that once erupted into a 15-year civil war that left more than 100,000 people dead.
Lebanese Christian communities feel under siege as Muslims leave overcrowded areas for once predominantly Christian neighborhoods.
Mohammed Awwad and his fiancee, both Muslims, recently found an affordable apartment for rent online in Hadat, southeast of Beirut, but were stunned when they found that Muslims are not allowed to settle in the town.
Hadat is the only area where such a ban is publicly announced. Elsewhere, it’s imposed in more discreet ways.