Major security expo opens in Riyadh

The three-day expo held under the patronage of Saudi Interior Minister Prince Abdul Aziz bin Saud bin Naif was inaugurated by Nasser bin Abdul Aziz Al-Dawood, the undersecretary of Interior Ministry. (Photo/Supplied)
Updated 04 November 2018
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Major security expo opens in Riyadh

  • As many as 130 companies from 22 countries are taking part in the event, which focuses on the areas of digital transformation and innovative security solutions for smart cities and other projects envisaged in Saudi Vision 2030

JEDDAH: The Saudi National Security and Risk Prevention Expo opened in the capital city on Sunday at the Riyadh International Convention and Exhibition Center.
The event, which is being held for the first time in Saudi Arabia, boasts widespread participation from industry leaders, experts and consultants, as well as top local, regional and international companies specialized in the field of security solutions and risk management, and features several workshops focusing on key issues related to innovation in security, in addition to live interactive demonstrations.
The three-day expo held under the patronage of Saudi Interior Minister Prince Abdul Aziz bin Saud bin Naif was inaugurated by Nasser bin Abdul Aziz Al-Dawood, the undersecretary of Interior Ministry.
Speaking at the inaugural ceremony, Lt. Gen. Sulaiman Al-Amro, the director general of the General Directorate for Civil Defense, said: “The event supports the Kingdom’s ambitions set by Vision 2030 and is one of the most important milestones achieved under the leadership of King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.”
He said the Kingdom’s authorities strive to further develop and boost the security sectors to address current and future challenges.
As many as 130 companies from 22 countries are taking part in the event, which focuses on the areas of digital transformation and innovative security solutions for smart cities and other projects envisaged in Saudi Vision 2030.
The event also features two forums. The first, titled “The future of Hajj safety and security forum,” delves into what Hajj seasons will require in terms of infrastructure, services and security facilities in order to create opportunities for organizations specializing the fields of security and risk prevention.
The second, “Smart Safe Cities Forum,” seeks to boost foreign direct investment in Saudi Arabia and support its objectives with regards to economic diversification.
The exhibition will also see the launch of innovation awards which will celebrate innovations across six categories: Virtual and augmented reality, drone detection, unmanned systems and robots, digital crime management and digital forensic clues, connected systems and smart security equipment and crowd control. A panel comprising industry experts will select the nominees and winners from each category.
Among the prominent speakers at the event is Mike King from the US, a leading authority on global public security and expert in crime investigation and legal studies, Dr. Faisal Al-Aayyan, vice president of Rabdan Academy in the UAE, Dr. Yehya Al-Marzouqi, executive director for strategy at Tawazun, and Franck Martin, safety expert at French firm ADP-I.
One of the many activities taking place at the event is the Smart and Safe City Control Center, an innovative platform to showcase the latest security technologies that will present the first simulation of its kind in Saudi Arabia for emergency response, including equipment especially designed for this purpose, as well as advanced solutions for monitoring and command centers.


Saudi artists draw inspiration from Islam

Wafa Alqunibit says her work has its place in the Kingdom. (Photo/Supplied)
Updated 15 min 30 sec ago
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Saudi artists draw inspiration from Islam

  • Wafa Alqunibit: “The difficulties that I faced were getting the names on point, because a lot of them are very similar to each other

JEDDAH: The work of Saudi sculptor Wafa Alqunibit is on display in a Jeddah art gallery. A small glass box holds objects that have the appearance, shape and texture of dates. Only they are wrought from metal and glint silver and gold.
Alqunibit concedes that art can sometimes be a taboo subject in Saudi society, but says her work has its place.
“I do this to promote and represent our culture and religion as I belong to a very religious family. We have our freedom and we have open minds and I just wanted to portray this image to the world,” she told Arab News.
Her Instagram feed shows other examples of her art, including sculptures featuring the distinctive ringed and slightly curled horns of the Arabian oryx, and videos of her carving, sanding and sawing using machinery that can be seen in any carpentry or masonry workshop.
But her journey toward the arts — specifically sculpture — has not been straightforward.
“I went to Portland (in the US) to complete my doctorate in human resources. But I ended up changing my major to arts and moved to Atlanta, Georgia, and they accepted me as a painter.”
But her professors thought she had different strengths — with one telling her she was born to be a tough person.
“At first I thought he was referring to me as an aggressive person, but later when I started sculpting I found out what he meant.”
She uses her work to communicate with people, especially those who misunderstand Islam, and recalled living in the US at a difficult time for Muslims.
“I took support from the arts, to tell people what we really are and now my artwork is displayed in so many galleries and I have been given the title of religious artist.”
Another artist taking inspiration from culture and religion is 26-year-old author Allaa Awad, who has taken the 99 names of Allah and turned them into poetry.
Her debut work, “Ninety-Nine: The Higher Power,” includes poems about purity, mercy, blessings and peace.
“I have encountered many people in life. They have a negative concept about life and God and I just wanted to turn that around and put my own perceptions of what I think God is, who He really is and how we should perceive Him,” she told Arab News.
She also experienced a struggle in her artistic journey, like Alqunibit did, but in a different way.
“The difficulties that I faced were getting the names on point, because a lot of them are very similar to each other. The best part was how people reacted to it on a spiritual level and how they were able to relate to what I had to say, rather than what online research had to say.”