Tunisia’s PM reshuffles cabinet to tackle economic crisis

Tunisia's Prime Minister Youssef Chahed speaks at the Assembly of People's Representatives in Tunis, Tunisia November 18, 2016. (Reuters)
Updated 06 November 2018
0

Tunisia’s PM reshuffles cabinet to tackle economic crisis

  • Chahed will make changes to at least six portfolios, including Tourism, Energy, Health and Transport, one of the sources said

TUNIS: Tunisian Prime Minister Youssef Chahed named 10 new ministers on Monday in a cabinet reshuffle he hopes will inject fresh blood into his government which has been widely criticised for failing to fix an economic crisis.
Key portfolios such as finance, foreign and the interior ministries were kept unchanged.
Since the toppling of autocrat Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali in 2011, Tunisia’s economy has been in crisis and nine cabinets have failed to resolve economic problems, including high inflation and unemployment.
Chahed named businessman Jewish Rene Trabelsi as minister of tourism, only the third member of the small minority of 2,000 Jews to enter a cabinet since Tunisia's independence in 1956.
A former foreign minister under Ben Ali, Kamel Morjan, became minister in charge of the public service, the country's main employer.
"This reshuffle is to make the work of government more effective and to put an end to the political and economic crisis," Chahed said in a statement.
Impatience has been rising among lenders such as the International Monetary Fund, which have kept the country afloat with billions of dollars in loans.
The reshuffle came amid a political crisis as the president's son, Hafedh Caid Essebsi, who is leader of the ruling party Nidaa Tounes, called for the dismissal of Chahed because of his government’s failure to revive the economy.
In a sign of the distrust inside the ruling party, President Beji Caid Essebsi rejected the resuffle as he had been informed too late about it without prior consultation, his spokeswoman Saida Garrach said.
Essebsi cannot stop the reshuffle. It needs to be approved by parliament where Chahed has assembled a majority of lawmakers backing him.
Nidaa Tounes rules with moderates who have backed Chahed.
Its demand has been supported by the powerful UGTT union which has also opposed Chahed's plans to overhaul loss-making public companies.
Tunisia has been hailed for its democratic transition since 2011 but the North African country has been hit by economic crisis and militant attacks since then.


Yemeni spokesman says militants seek to ignite Hodeidah fighting

Updated 21 March 2019
0

Yemeni spokesman says militants seek to ignite Hodeidah fighting

  • Renewed fighting in Hodeidah would risk severing the main passage for humanitarian aid
  • A senior Houthi member earlier said a withdrawal is “impossible”

CAIRO: Yemen’s militants are igniting more conflict by their refusal to give up control of the key port city of Hodeida, the focus of months of UN-brokered talks, a government spokesman said.
Renewed fighting in Hodeidah would risk severing the main passage for humanitarian aid to the rest of the country, including northern Yemen, a heartland of the Houthi militants.
Rageh Badi, spokesman for the internationally recognized Yemen government, denounced remarks by senior militant leader Mohammed Ali Al-Houthi who earlier this week told The Associated Press that the Saudi-led coalition, which backs the government side in the conflict, is trying to change the terms of the agreement struck last year in Sweden and that a militant withdrawal would therefore be “impossible.”
Badi told reporters at a press conference Wednesday in the southern city of Aden that such remarks could set off renewed fighting in Hodeidah, the key entry point for international aid to the war-torn country, and violate the tentative peace agreement reached by the two sides in Sweden.
The remarks are a “renunciation of the Hodeidah agreement and a declaration of war,” Badi said, urging the UN to step up pressure on the rebels to prevent another “explosion of the situation” in Hodeidah. Otherwise, renewed fighting is just a “few days” away, he added.