Qatar’s Emir says he regrets the conflict with Quartet

The Emir said he regretted the conflict, but said he believed 'crisis will pass'. (File/AP)
Updated 06 November 2018
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Qatar’s Emir says he regrets the conflict with Quartet

  • The Emir says the country will continue to develop its oil and gas industries
  • Emir says he believes 'crisis will pass'

DOHA: Qatar’s Emir Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad al-Thani said on Tuesday he regrets the continuation of conflict with other Arab states, but added that “crises will pass,” outlining the nation’s economic achievements over the past year.

The country would continue to develop its oil and gas industries as it is keen to preserve its status as the top liquefied natural gas exporter in the world, and that the country had grown its exports by 18 percent last year and slashed spending by 20 percent, Tamim said in a speech to the Arab state's shoura council.

Qatar’s currency has preserved its value since the start of the rift last year and the economy has diversified to overcome the impact of sanctions imposed by other Arab states, Tamim said.


20 million children miss out on life-saving vaccines, says UN

World Health Organization (WHO) director-general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus (C - R) listens to UN Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator Mark Lowcock during a meeting hold by the United Nations on the Ebola disease in Democratic Republic of Congo, on July 15, 2019, in Geneva. (AFP)
Updated 11 min 23 sec ago
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20 million children miss out on life-saving vaccines, says UN

  • If these children fall ill, the report said, they are at risk of the most severe health consequences, and are least able to get the treatment and care they need

LONDON: More than one in 10 children — or 20 million worldwide — missed out last year on vaccines against life-threatening diseases such as measles, diphtheria and tetanus, the World Health Organization and the UNICEF children’s fund said on Monday.
In a report on global immunization coverage, the UN agencies found that vaccination levels are stagnating, notably in poor countries or areas of conflict.
“Vaccines are one of our most important tools for preventing outbreaks and keeping the world safe,” the WHO’s Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said.
“It’s often those who are most at risk — the poorest, the most marginalized, those touched by conflict or forced from their homes — who are persistently missed,” he said. “Far too many are left behind.”
The WHO/UNICEF report found that since 2010, vaccination coverage with three doses of diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis (whooping cough) vaccine and one dose of measles vaccine has stalled at around 86 percent.
The report said this was too low, since 95 percent coverage is generally needed to provide “herd immunity” to those who are not vaccinated.
“Measles is a real-time indicator of where we have more work to do to fight preventable diseases,” said Henrietta Fore, UNICEF’s executive director. “An outbreak points to communities that are missing out on vaccines ... (and) we have to exhaust every effort to immunize every child.”
Almost half the world’s unvaccinated children are in just 16 countries: Afghanistan, CAR, Chad, DR Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syria and Yemen.
If these children fall ill, the report said, they are at risk of the most severe health consequences, and are least able to get the treatment and care they need.