Boeing to issue safety advice on 737 MAX after Indonesia crash

A retrieval crew moves a recovered engine from the crashed Lion Air jet for further investigation in Jakarta on Sunday, November 4. (AP)
Updated 07 November 2018
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Boeing to issue safety advice on 737 MAX after Indonesia crash

  • The crash of a Lion Air 737 killed 189 people last week
  • Indonesian investigators said this week the plane had an air-speed indicator problem
JAKARTA: Boeing issued a special bulletin Wednesday addressing a sensor problem flagged by Indonesian safety officials investigating the crash of a Lion Air 737 that killed 189 people last week.
The planemaker said local aviation officials believed pilots may have been given wrong information by the plane’s automated systems before the fatal crash.
“The Indonesian National Transportation Safety Committee has indicated that Lion Air flight 610 experienced erroneous input from one of its AOA (Angle of Attack) sensors,” the warning said.
“Boeing issued an Operations Manual Bulletin (OMB) directing operators to existing flight crew procedures to address circumstances where there is erroneous input from an AOA sensor.”
An AOA sensor provides data about the angle at which wind is passing over the wings and tells pilots how much lift a plane is getting.
Lion Air JT610 plunged into the Java Sea less than half an hour after taking off from Jakarta on a routine flight to Pangkal Pinang city. There were no survivors.
Search teams have filled some 186 body bags with remains found after the devastating crash, but only 44 victims have been identified so far.
Divers have recovered one of the two “black boxes” — the flight data recorder — but are still searching for the cockpit voice recorder, in the hope it will shed more light on the cause of the disaster.
Indonesian investigators said this week the plane had an air-speed indicator problem on the doomed flight and on three previous journeys.


Apple China says it will push software update in bid to resolve Qualcomm case

Updated 14 December 2018
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Apple China says it will push software update in bid to resolve Qualcomm case

  • Apple will carry out the software updates at the start of next week to address the concern
  • A court found Apple infringed two patents held by the chipmaker and banned sales of older iPhone models

SHANGHAI/SAN FRANCISCO: Apple Inc. , facing a court ban in China on some of its iPhone models over alleged infringement of Qualcomm Inc. patents, said on Friday it will push software updates to users in a bid to resolve potential issues.
Apple will carry out the software updates at the start of next week “to address any possible concern about our compliance with the order,” the firm said in a statement sent to Reuters.
Earlier this week, Qualcomm said a Chinese court had ordered a ban on sales of some older Apple iPhone models for violating two of its patents, though intellectual property lawyers said the ban would still likely take time to enforce.
“Based on the iPhone models we offer today in China, we believe we are in compliance,” Apple said.
“Early next week we will deliver a software update for iPhone users in China addressing the minor functionality of the two patents at issue in the case.”
The case, brought by Qualcomm, is part of a global patent dispute between the two US companies that includes dozens of lawsuits. It creates uncertainty over Apple’s business in one of its biggest markets at a time when concerns over waning demand for new iPhones are battering its shares.
Qualcomm has said that the Fuzhou Intermediate People’s Court in China found Apple infringed two patents held by the chipmaker and ordered an immediate ban on sales of older iPhone models, from the 6S through the X.
Apple has said that all of its phone models remained on sale in mainland China and that it had filed a request for reconsideration with the court. All the models appeared to be available to buy on Apple’s China website on Friday.
Qualcomm, the biggest supplier of chips for mobile phones, filed its case in China in late 2017, arguing that Apple infringed patents on features related to resizing photographs and managing apps on a touch screen.