The Six: The Louvre Abu Dhabi’s anniversary celebrations

Louvre Abu Dhabi. (Shutterstock)
Updated 07 November 2018
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The Six: The Louvre Abu Dhabi’s anniversary celebrations

DUBAI:The Louvre Abu Dhabi is celebrating it’s first anniversary with pop ups and a certain pop star.

Dua Lipa concert
The British singer is set to perform at the Louvre Abu Dhabi’s concert village on Nov. 11. The “One Kiss” singer last performed in Abu Dhabi in February.

Spoken Art
From Nov. 9 – 10, a series of pop-up performances titled “Spoken Art,” directed by Dorian Paul Rogers, will see seven spoken-word poets perform from across the museum, from the permanent galleries to under the famous, intricate dome.

Constellations
From Nov. 6 -18, Emirati interdisciplinary designer Salem Al-Mansoori’s animated digital work will be on show in the museum’s entrance lobby. His work, “Constellations,” reflects data about the museum’s visitors collected throughout its first year.

Pop-up architecture weekend
The pop-up architecture weekend, from Nov. 9-10, will host free workshops where participants will build constructions inspired by the Louvre Abu Dhabi’s dome using large scale geometric shapes.

Manga Lab
Running until Jan. 5, this area features retro arcade video games and explores the and influences of traditional Japanese art on modern day manga and anime.

Japanese Connections: The Birth of Modern Décor
The exhibition showcasing 19th and 20th century Japanese paintings, prints and folding screens will run until Nov. 24.

 


French president advised to return looted African art treasures

Updated 21 November 2018
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French president advised to return looted African art treasures

  • Calls have been growing in Africa for the restitution of their cultural treasures
  • Britain too has faced numerous calls to return artefacts to the countries they originate from

PARIS: Experts appointed by President Emmanuel Macron will advise him on Friday to allow the return of thousands of African artworks held in French museums, a radical shift in policy which could put pressure on other former colonial powers.
Calls have been growing in Africa for the restitution of their cultural treasures, but French law strictly forbids the government from ceding state property, even in well-documented cases of pillaging.
But in a speech in Burkina Faso in November last year, Macron said “Africa’s heritage cannot just be in European private collections and museums.”
He later asked French art historian Benedicte Savoy and Senegalese writer Felwine Sarr to study the matter, and they are to present Macron with their report on Friday.
According to a copy seen by AFP, they recommend amending French law to allow the restitution of cultural works if bilateral accords are struck between France and African states.
The change would apply in particular to works held in museums which were “transferred from their original territory during the French colonial period,” the report said.
“We propose changing heritage laws so that all types of cases can be taken into account, and the criteria of consentment can be invoked,” Sarr told French daily Liberation in an article posted late Tuesday.
Of the estimated 90,000 African artworks in French museum collections, around 70,000 are at Paris’ Quai Branly museum, created by ex-president Jacques Chirac, a keen admirer of African and Asian arts.
In order to proceed with any restitutions, “a request would have to be lodged by an African country, based on inventory lists which we will have sent them,” according to the report.
The prospect has raised hackles among some curators and art dealers who say it would eventually empty museums and galleries in some Western countries.
Critics also say the move could prompt private French collectors to move their works out of the country for fear of seizure.
European conservationists have also raised practical concerns, worrying artefacts could be stolen or handled improperly if given to inexperienced museums in politically unstable countries.
Britain too has faced numerous calls to return artefacts to the countries they originate from, including the Elgin Marbles to Greece and the Benin Bronzes to Nigeria.
On Tuesday, the governor of Easter Island in the Pacific tearfully begged the British Museum to return one of its famous statues.
The London museum has held the Hoa Hakananai’a, one of the most spiritually important of the Chilean island’s stone monoliths, for 150 years.