Women drivers are part of the future of Formula One, says F1 boss

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Updated 07 November 2018
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Women drivers are part of the future of Formula One, says F1 boss

  • Chase Carey wants to see more diverse range on drivers on the grid.
  • Hanoi will become only the third Southeast Asian nation to host an F1 race.

HANOI: Formula One’s ideal future will see Asian, American and female drivers battling for glory on race circuits around the world, the sport’s chief executive Chase Carey has said.
Carey announced that Vietnam capital Hanoi will become only the third Southeast Asian nation to host an F1 race, after Malaysia and Singapore, when it puts on a Grand Prix for the first time in 2020.
While the move is part of F1’s strategy to move into markets where it hopes to groom a new generation of fans, and boost revenues, Carey hopes the spin-off is the emergence of drivers from all around the globe.
“We want to provide opportunities for drivers of different nationalities from around the world,” he said.
“We’d love to have a Chinese driver, an American driver, a female driver, a Vietnamese driver, all be part of our future.
“We’d love nothing better than to have races around the world, to have teams and drivers from around the world.”
Although Asia has produced several F1 drivers in the past, from pioneering “Prince Bira” of Thailand in the 1950s to India’s Narain Karthikeyan in 2012, none have reached a competitive level.
Historically, Japan leads the way for Asia, having produced 20 drivers so far, though there have been none from China or Vietnam.
Carey believes that all that could change with F1’s latest foray into Asia.
“Asia is certainly important as a growth engine of the world and it will just become increasingly important part,” said Carey. AFP
“Being in Asia is certainly a cornerstone to our long-term growth strategy.” AN


A HAT-TRICK OF HOPES: What the UAE and Saudi Arabia should be looking for from their friendly

Updated 20 March 2019
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A HAT-TRICK OF HOPES: What the UAE and Saudi Arabia should be looking for from their friendly

  • Can the Whites and Green Falcons find the back of the net more often?
  • Both teams need to set the tone ahead of the important World Cup qualifiers.

LONDON: Ahead of Thursday’s friendly between the UAE and Saudi Arabia Arab News looks at the main priorities for both sides as they embark on their new eras after the Asian Cup and ahead of the all-important the World Cup qualifiers.

FIND THOSE SCORING BOOTS

For the past 18 months both sides have struggled for goals. Under Alberto Zaccheroni the UAE scored just 10 goals in the past nine matches — five of those coming against lowly Kyrgyzstan and India — and likewise the Green Falcons have also struggled to find the back of the net. Heading toward the World Cup qualifiers, now is the time to find those scoring boots.

PUT ON A SHOW

Both sides have technically gifted players, can keep the ball and at times trouble opposition defenses. But both have been too defensive, too safety-first and, at times, too dull. Football is supposed to be entertainment, and the friendlies ahead of the World Cup qualifiers might be no bad time to throw caution to the wind and see what the players can do in the final third.

SET THE TONE

As the modern cliche goes, a week is a long time in football. With all the sackings and player movements, it is not hard to see the kernel of truth in that overused saying. But, conversely, time can also move very fast in the “Beautiful Game.” It may be six months before the World Cup qualifiers begin, but it will be September before the coaches and players know it. Set the tone and tactics now and triumphs will be easier to come by then and, more importantly, further into the future.