US South Asia policy relieves India of sanctions over Chabahar port 

A security personnel looks on at oil docks at the port of Kalantari in the city of Chabahar, 300km east of the Strait of Hormuz, Iran, in this January 17, 2012 file photo. (REUTERS)
Updated 08 November 2018
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US South Asia policy relieves India of sanctions over Chabahar port 

  • Pant underlines that “Chabahar is so crucial to Afghanistan that Americans must have realized this is not only beneficial for India but also for the long-term American interest in the region

NEW DELHI: The US decision not to impose sanctions on India for continuing the development of Chabahar port in Iran has not come as a surprise to foreign policy experts in New Delhi.
“According to Trump’s South Asia policy, India is considered as a strategic ally, which means that the US does not want its ally to look weak in any manner,” said Zakir Hussain, a New Delhi-based foreign policy expert.
“India has made it very clear to the US that the whole idea of a sound Afghan strategy would imply the development of Chabahar port in some way. So the exemption is not a big surprise,” said Harsh V. Pant of the Observer Research Foundation (ORF), a New Delhi-based think tank.
On Tuesday, the US State Department in a statement said that the Indian construction activities in Chabahar port will not invite any punitive action despite the kicking in of sanctions against Iran from Monday.
“This exception relates to reconstruction assistance and economic development for Afghanistan. These activities are vital for the ongoing support of Afghanistan’s growth and humanitarian relief,” said a spokesperson of the State Department in a briefing on Tuesday.
The exemption granted by US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo will permit the construction of a railway line from Chabahar port to Afghanistan, and for shipments to the war-torn country of non-sanctionable goods, such as food and medicine.
“The president’s South Asia strategy underscores our ongoing support of Afghanistan’s economic growth and development as well as our close partnership with India,” the state department spokesperson said.
Pant underlines that “Chabahar is so crucial to Afghanistan that Americans must have realized this is not only beneficial for India but also for the long-term American interest in the region.”
He told Arab News that “this exemption underlines the point that Washington recognizes the challenges it faces in Afghanistan and the role both India and the US can play in putting pressure on Pakistan. Chahbahar not only provides alternative routes to reach Afghanistan but also reduces the salience of Pakistan in the region.”
Pant said that “the exception is a recalibration of the US policy in South Asia that gives primacy to India’s role in Afghanistan.”
Sujata Ashwarya Cheema, of New Delhi-based Jamia Milia Islamia University (JMIU), said that the “exemption shows the Trump administration is looking for a compromise on the Iran issue. It wants to craft a new arrangement albeit agreeable to its allies, Israel and Saudi Arabia.”
Hussain argued that “in the future the US might like to use Chabahar port as an alternative route and limit its dependence on Pakistan. Besides, the port serves Washington’s strategic interest in containing China’s growing influence in South and Central Asia.”
However, Meena Singh Roy, of the Institute of Defense Studies and Analyzes (IDSA), a New Delhi-based think tank, called the whole exemption “vague.”
India has committed $500 million to the project and $2 billion to build a railway line from Chabahar to Hajjigaj in Afghanistan.
In December last year, the first phase of the Chabahar port in southeast Iran was inaugurated. The port opened a new strategic transit route between India, Iran and Afghanistan — bypassing Pakistan.
In an agreement signed in 2016, India, Iran and Afghanistan agreed to establish a Transit and Transport Corridor among the three countries using Chabahar Port as one of the regional hubs for sea transportation in Iran, besides multi-modal transport of goods and passengers across the three nations.


Nearly four in 10 US HIV infections from people unaware of infection

This electron microscope image made available by the U.S. National Institutes of Health shows a human T cell, in blue, under attack by HIV, in yellow, the virus that causes AIDS. (AP)
Updated 16 min 54 sec ago
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Nearly four in 10 US HIV infections from people unaware of infection

  • The Trump administration has said it will invest $291 million in the next financial year to fight HIV/AIDS, which has plateaued since 2013 to around 39,000 annual transmissions
WASHINGTON: Almost 40 percent of new HIV cases in the US occur because people do not know they are infected, while a similar proportion know but are not in treatment, according to a study released Monday.
The report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is based on 2016 data and aims to bolster a strategy outlined by President Donald Trump to end the epidemic within 10 years.
The strategy has two main strands: far more widespread screening, and enabling the infected better access to treatment from the moment they test positive.
The study found that 38 percent of infections came from HIV-positive people who were unaware of their status, and 43 percent from people who knew they were infected but took no anti-retroviral drugs.
The remaining infections came from people who were receiving HIV treatment but were not yet “virally suppressed.”
The CDC blamed financial, social and other reasons for people not using medication, which these days typically comes in the form of a daily pill with minimal side effects.
The study said that the infection rate from the half million people in the United States who take medication and are virally suppressed — meaning they cannot pass on the disease to others — was zero.

The most at-risk group remains homosexual men, with almost three-quarters of new infections coming from men having sex with men, the report said.
Five percent of infections came from intravenous drug abuse among homosexual men, while 10 percent came from injecting drugs among the rest of the population.
Twelve percent of infections were among heterosexuals. Overall, the highest rate of transmission was among 13 to 24-year-olds.
The Trump administration has said it will invest $291 million in the next financial year to fight HIV/AIDS, which has plateaued since 2013 to around 39,000 annual transmissions.
The goal is to reduce that number by 75 percent within five years and by 90 percent in 10 years.
Questioned about the relatively small amount of money earmarked for the multi-billion dollar task of treating HIV carriers, CDC head Robert Redfield said he was “confident that the resources that are required to accomplish this mission are in the long term plan.”
The CDC, based in Atlanta, Georgia, wants doctors to make HIV screening a routine procedure.
“Everyone between the ages of 13 and 64 should get tested for HIV at least once in their lifetime,” said Eugene McCray, the head of the CDC’s Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention.
“Those at higher risk should get tested at least annually,” he said.
“The key to controlling is helping those with HIV to control the virus,” said the CDC’s Jonathan Mermin, who focuses on preventing the spread of the HIV as well as other sexually transmitted diseases, tuberculosis and hepatitis.
“Time spent working closely with patients who are having trouble paying for, picking up or taking their daily medications is time well spent“