Oil tanker and frigate collide off Norway, seven injured

The Norwegian frigate KNM Helge Ingstad’ takes on water after collision with the tanker Sola TS on Thursday, November 8. (NTB Scanpix/AFP)
Updated 08 November 2018
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Oil tanker and frigate collide off Norway, seven injured

  • The KNM Helge Ingstad frigate was evacuated after the collision with the Sola TS tanker
  • ‘It took on a lot of water and there is a real danger that it sinks where it is’

OSLO: A Norwegian navy frigate and a Maltese oil tanker collided in a fjord in western Norway on Thursday, local authorities said, with seven people receiving minor injuries.
The KNM Helge Ingstad frigate, which was returning from NATO’s Trident Juncture exercises, was evacuated after the collision with the Sola TS tanker, Norway’s army said.
“It took on a lot of water and there is a real danger that it sinks where it is,” an official for the Sola rescue center said.
An image published by Norwegian broadcaster NRK showed that water had almost reached the level of the frigate’s helicopter platform.
A total of 137 people were on board the frigate while 23 were on the tanker, which was flying the Maltese flag, the official said.
The 62,000-ton tanker received only slight damage and is waiting to be towed to a nearby oil terminal, the rescue center official said.
“A small oil slick from the frigate has been detected but nothing large,” the official added.
The circumstances of the accident, which took place shortly after 4:00 am (0300 GMT) in the Hjeltefjord near Bergen, are not yet clear.
“The armed forces is now reviewing all the means available in the region to assist the KNM Helge Ingstad,” Lt. Col. Ivar Moen said.
Built in 2009, the KNM Helge Ingstad participated in chemical disarmament operations in Syria between December 2013 and May 2014.


Australian Daesh orphans rescued from Syria camp

Updated 7 min 44 sec ago
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Australian Daesh orphans rescued from Syria camp

  • The children are believed to be aged between two and 17 and were living in a camp in northern Syria
  • Several European countries, including France and Belgium, have repatriated children from Syria in recent months

SYDNEY: Eight orphans of Australian Daesh fighters have been spirited out of a camp in Syria, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said Monday, in an apparent U-turn.
The children and grandchildren of two notorious militants are now in the care of Australian officials, he said in a statement.
The children are believed to be aged between two and 17 and were living in a camp in northern Syria — making consular access all but impossible.
Morrison previously indicated his government would only help citizens if they approached an embassy or consulate but appeared to have had a change of heart.
“The fact that parents put their children into harm’s way by taking them into a war zone was a despicable act,” Morrison said in a statement.
“However, children should not be punished for the crimes of their parents.”
The group includes three surviving children and two grandchildren of Sydney-born Khaled Sharrouf — who came to prominence after posting a photo of one of his sons holding the head of a Syrian soldier.
There are also three children of Yasin Rizvic who traveled from Australia to Syria with his wife.
Both Daesh fighters are presumed dead.
Morrison did not name the children or elaborate on how they were removed, but confirmed they were “repatriated from the conflict zone into the care of Australian government officials.”
The Australian Broadcasting Corporation reported that the children had been moved to a country neighboring Syria.
Their case had gained widespread attention after the grandmother of the Sharrouf children — 17-year-old heavily pregnant Zaynab, her younger sister Hoda, their eight-year-old brother Hamzeh, and Zaynab’s two young children Ayesha, three, and Fatima, two — had pleaded with Canberra to bring them home.
Grandmother Karen Nettleton even traveled to the camp earlier this year to meet them but was rebuffed by authorities, and Morrison said he did not want to put Australian lives at risk.
The prime minister on Monday repeated his concerns, adding that “repatriating these children was not a decision the Australian government made lightly.”
“Australia’s national security and the safety of our people and personnel have always been our most important considerations in this matter,” he said.
The fate of foreign fighters and their families has become a significant problem for governments as the conflict against Daesh draws to a close.
Several European countries, including France and Belgium, have repatriated children from Syria in recent months.