What We Are Reading Today: The Myth of the Eternal Return

Updated 09 November 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: The Myth of the Eternal Return

Author: Mircea Eliade

First published in English in 1954, this founding work of the history of religions secured the North American reputation of the Romanian émigré-scholar Mircea Eliade. Making reference to an astonishing number of cultures and drawing on scholarship published in no fewer than half a dozen European languages, The Myth of the Eternal Return illuminates the religious beliefs and rituals of a wide variety of archaic religious cultures. While acknowledging that a return to their practices is impossible, Eliade passionately insists on the value of understanding their views to enrich the contemporary imagination of what it is to be human, according to a review on the Princeton University Press website. This book includes an introduction from Jonathan Z. Smith that provides essential context and encourages readers to engage in an informed way with this classic text.
Mircea Eliade (1907–1986) was the Sewell L. Avery Distinguished Service Professor of the History of Religions at the University of Chicago.


What We Are Reading Today: The Age of Surveillance Capitalism by Shoshana Zuboff

Updated 20 January 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: The Age of Surveillance Capitalism by Shoshana Zuboff

  • New book reveals business model that underpins the digital world

Shoshana Zuboff’s new book is a chilling exposé of the business model that underpins the digital world. 

A review published in goodreads.com said that The Age of Surveillance Capitalism is neither a hand-wringing narrative of danger and decline nor a digital fairy tale. Rather, it offers a deeply reasoned and evocative examination of the contests over the next chapter of capitalism that will decide the meaning of information civilization in the 21st century. 

The Age of Surveillance Capital is a striking and illuminating book. 

A fellow reader remarked to me that it reminded him of Thomas Piketty’s magnum opus, Capital in the Twenty-First Century, in that it opens one’s eyes to things we ought to have noticed, but had not. 

And if we fail to tame the new capitalist mutant rampaging through our societies then we will only have ourselves to blame, for we can no longer plead ignorance,” stated John Naughton in a review published in The Guardian.