Globalization dominates WEF meeting in Dubai

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The UAE’s Minister of Cabinet Affairs Mohammed Al-Gergawi gave the opening remarks at the event. (World Economic Forum/CC-BY-SA)
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The UAE’s Minister of Cabinet Affairs Mohammed Al-Gergawi gave the opening remarks at the event. (World Economic Forum/CC-BY-SA)
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Updated 12 November 2018
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Globalization dominates WEF meeting in Dubai

  • The two-day WEF conference is attended by more than 600 members of government, academia, civil society and business, as well as other fields
  • The event is a warm up to the WEF Annual Meeting in Davos in 2019

DUBAI: The World Economic Forum’s (WEF) annual meeting of the Global Future Councils (GFC) began in Dubai on Sunday, with globalization being the main theme tackled at this year’s seminar.
“The rise of populism, protectionism and nationalism have short-term benefits,” but history has shown they have “a detrimental impact,” Australian MP and former Foreign Minister Julie Bishop said at the opening plenary.
“How many times does history have to show us what industry subsidization does, or what protectionism and closing markets does, or what unaffordable support for welfare state does to a nation?” she asked.
The UAE’s Minister of Cabinet Affairs Mohammed Al-Gergawi gave the opening remarks at the event, saying the world now has four priorities: Collaboration and participation, new regulations, government productivity and staying open to globalization.
“Without globalization, we wouldn’t have seen the emergence of multitrillion-dollar corporations like Apple and Amazon that succeeded due to no states shutting its doors,” he said.


The opening panel, titled “Globalization 4.0,” included Bishop, Slovak Foreign Minister Miroslav Lajcak, Argentina’s former Foreign Minister Susana Malcorra, the president of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, William Burns, and a visiting professor and fellow at Japan’s Musashino Institute for Global Affairs, Yoriko Kawaguchi. The panel was moderated by CNBC anchor and reporter Hadley Gamble.


Kawaguchi said several rapid changes are coming, such as technology that will need constant collaboration among countries.
“Technology is very important, and that will bring in many unknown challenges,” she added.

“To cope with some of these challenges, we’ll have to exchange our views, we’ll have to exchange our knowledge, we have to exchange our policies to deal with them, and we need to cooperate.”
Malcorra said while cooperation among states is important, the core of the problem lies with citizen representation and trust in their leadership.
“At the heart of what we’re facing here is the fact that the common citizen doesn’t feel… represented well enough by institutions, be they national or international,” she added.
“And there’s a break, in my view, in the social (contract) between citizens and their leadership.”

Lajcak said: “The link between leadership and citizens needs to be strengthened, and the communication has to run both ways.”
Burns said leaderships today need to understand the “very real anxieties that have driven the kind of anti-globalization atmosphere.”
Malcorra said countries need to adopt a “We First” model, taking a jab at US President Donald Trump’s slogan “America First.”
The two-day WEF conference is attended by more than 600 members of government, academia, civil society and business, as well as other fields.
It will address global, regional and geopolitical issues, and explore topics related to the “fourth industrial revolution.”
Most of the sessions will be off the record and not attended by the media. The event is a warm up to the WEF Annual Meeting in Davos in 2019.

Read Frank Kane's Big issues from the World Economic Forum’s intellectual heart here


Boeing sets briefing on 737 MAX aircraft software and training updates

Updated 5 min 15 sec ago
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Boeing sets briefing on 737 MAX aircraft software and training updates

  • The 737 MAX is Boeing’s best-selling plane, with orders worth more than $500 billion at list prices
  • Regulators this month grounded the worldwide fleet of the aircraft following a crash that killed 157 people
ADDIS ABABA/SINGAPORE: Boeing will brief more than 200 global airline pilots, technical leaders and regulators this week on software and training updates for its 737 MAX aircraft, as Ethiopian Airlines expressed confidence in the planemaker despite a recent crash.
The carrier will work with Boeing and other airlines to make air travel safer, its chief executive, Tewolde Gebremariam, said, after regulators this month grounded the worldwide fleet of the aircraft following a crash that killed 157 people.
“Despite the tragedy, Boeing and Ethiopian Airlines will continue to be linked well into the future,” he said in a statement on Monday. “Ethiopian Airlines believes in Boeing. They have been a partner of ours for many years.”
However, many questions on the 737 MAX “remain without answers,” Tewolde added, and a spokesman for the carrier said it had no “immediate plans” to attend the Boeing session, without giving further details.
Wednesday’s meeting is a sign that Boeing is nearing completion on a planned software patch required to return the grounded fleet to commercial service, though it will still need approval from regulators.
The session in Renton, Washington is part of an effort to reach all current, and many future, 737 MAX operators and their home regulators to discuss software and training updates to the jet, Boeing said in a statement.
The 737 MAX is Boeing’s best-selling plane, with orders worth more than $500 billion at list prices.
Garuda Indonesia was invited to the briefing, Chief Executive Ari Askhara said on Monday. Last week, Indonesia’s national carrier said it planned to cancel its order for 49 737 MAX jets, citing a loss of passenger trust.
“We were informed on Friday, but because it is short notice, we can’t send a pilot,” Askhara said, adding that the airline had requested a webinar with Boeing, only to be rejected.
A Boeing spokeswoman said the meeting formed part of a series of in-person information sessions.
“We have been scheduling, and will continue to arrange, additional meetings to communicate with all current, and many future, MAX customers and operators,” she said.
Garuda, which has only one 737 MAX, had been reconsidering its order before the Ethiopian crash, as had fellow Indonesian carrier Lion Air, which suffered a crash in October that killed all 189 aboard.
Boeing had informed the airline of the meeting but it might not attend, said Lion Air Managing Director Daniel Putut, who declined further comment.
Singapore Airlines Ltd. said its offshoot, SilkAir, which operates the 737 MAX, had received an invitation to the meeting and would send representatives.
Representatives of the Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore will also attend, a spokeswoman for the regulator said.
Korean Air Lines Co. Ltd, which, before the grounding, had been due to receive its first 737 MAX in April, said it planned to send pilots to Renton. South Korean low-cost carrier Eastar Jet will send two pilots, a spokesman said.
On Saturday, teams from the three US airlines that own 737 MAX jets joined a session in Renton reviewing a planned software upgrade.
Flydubai representatives attended that session and some will also attend this week’s meeting, a spokeswoman for the Dubai-based airline said.
A US official briefed on the matter on Saturday said the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) had not yet signed off on the software upgrade and training but aimed to review and approve them by April.
It remained unclear whether the software upgrade, called “design changes” by the FAA, will resolve concerns stemming from the investigation into the March 10 Ethiopian Airlines crash.
Tewolde, the airline’s chief executive, said until there were more answers about the 737 MAX, the planes should remain grounded, adding, “Putting one more life at risk is too much.”
The US official said planned changes included 15 minutes of training to help pilots deactivate the anti-stall system known as MCAS in the event of faulty sensor data or other issues. It also included some self-guided instruction, the official added.