Oil extends 7% slump from previous day

The surge in US production is contributing to rising global stockpiles. (Reuters)
Updated 14 November 2018
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Oil extends 7% slump from previous day

  • Oil markets are being pressured from two sides: a surge in supply and increasing concerns about an economic slowdown
  • OPEC has been making increasingly frequent public statements that it would start withholding crude in 2019

SINGAPORE: Oil markets slipped again on Wednesday, extending losses from a 7 percent plunge the previous session as surging supply and the specter of faltering demand scared off investors.
US West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil futures were at $55.50 per barrel at 0514 GMT, down 19 cents from their last settlement.
International benchmark Brent crude oil futures were down 22 cents at $65.25 per barrel.
Crude oil has lost over a quarter of its value since early October in what has become one of the biggest declines since prices collapsed in 2014.
The slump in spot prices has turned the entire forward curve for crude oil upside down.
Spot prices in September were significantly higher than those for later delivery, a structure known as backwardation that implies a tight market as it is unattractive to put oil into storage.
By mid-November, the curve had flipped into contango, when crude prices for immediate delivery are cheaper than those for later dispatch. That implies an oversupplied market as it makes it attractive to store oil for later sale.
Oil markets are being pressured from two sides: a surge in supply and increasing concerns about an economic slowdown.
US crude oil output from its seven major shale basins is expected to hit a record of 7.94 million barrels per day (bpd) in December, the US Department of Energy’s Energy Information Administration (EIA) said on Tuesday.
That surge in onshore output has helped overall US crude production hit a record 11.6 million bpd, making the United States the world’s biggest oil producer ahead of Russia and Saudi Arabia.
Most analysts expect US output to climb above 12 million bpd within the first half of 2019.
“This will, in our view, cap any upside above $85 per barrel (for oil prices),” said Jon Andersson, head of commodities at Vontobel Asset Management.
The surge in US production is contributing to rising stockpiles.
US crude stocks climbed by 7.8 million barrels in the week ending Nov. 2 to 432 million as refineries cut output, data from industry group the American Petroleum Institute showed on Tuesday.
The producer group Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) has been watching the jump in supply and price slump with concern.
OPEC has been making increasingly frequent public statements that it would start withholding crude in 2019 to tighten supply and prop up prices.
“OPEC and Russia are under pressure to reduce current production levels, which is a decision that we expect to be taken at the next OPEC meeting on Dec. 6,” said Andersson.
That puts OPEC on a collision course with US President Donald Trump, who publicly supports low oil prices and who has called on OPEC not to cut production.


China bemoans US ‘bullying’ of Huawei

Updated 23 May 2019
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China bemoans US ‘bullying’ of Huawei

  • The trade spat between US and China escalated after President Donald Trump issued orders last week on grounds of national security
  • Trump’s move effectively bans US companies from supplying Huawei and affiliates with critical components

BEIJING: China’s foreign minister has slammed US moves against telecom giant Huawei as “economic bullying,” and warned that Beijing was ready to “fight to the very end” in its trade war with Washington.
The trade spat between the world’s top two economies escalated after President Donald Trump issued orders on grounds of national security last week that have prompted several foreign firms to distance themselves from Huawei.
“The US use of state power to arbitrarily exert pressure on a private Chinese company like Huawei is typical economic bullying,” Foreign Minister Wang Yi said Wednesday at a meeting in Kyrgyzstan of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO), a regional security group led by Beijing and Moscow.
Trump’s move effectively bans US companies from supplying Huawei and affiliates with critical components over activities the US says are contrary its national security or foreign policy interests.
Japan’s Panasonic announced on Thursday that it was cutting back business with Huawei in light of the US ban. A day earlier, mobile carriers in Japan and Britain said they would postpone the release of Huawei smartphones.
“Some people in the United States do not want China to enjoy the legitimate right to develop, and seek to impede its development process,” Wang said, according to a foreign ministry statement issued late Wednesday.
“This extremely presumptuous and egocentric American approach is not able to gain the approval and support of the international community.”
The two countries have yet to set a date to recommence trade negotiations after they resumed their tariffs battle earlier this month, with Trump raising punitive duties on $200 billion in Chinese goods and Beijing hiking those on $60 billion in American products.
Trump has accused China of reneging on its commitments in the trade negotiations. Beijing has countered that any deal needs to be balanced.
“It is impossible for us to sign or recognize an agreement that is unequal,” Wang said.
“If the United States is willing to negotiate on an equal footing, then on the Chinese side, the door is wide open. But if the United States opts for a policy of maximum pressure, then China will take them on and fight to the end,” he said.