FaceOf: John Phillip Abizaid, US ambassador nominee to Saudi Arabia

John Phillip Abizaid
Updated 16 November 2018
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FaceOf: John Phillip Abizaid, US ambassador nominee to Saudi Arabia

  • Abizaid graduated from the US Military Academy at West Point in 1973.
  • A fluent speaker of Arabic, Abizaid served as a general in the Arabian Gulf, Bosnian, Kosovo, Afghanistan and Iraq wars

John Phillip Abizaid is set to be the next US ambassador to Saudi Arabia. A Lebanese-American, he was a four-star general in the US Army. Abizaid retired in 2007 after 34 years’ service. At that time he was the longest-serving commander of US Central Command. Previously he served as a distinguished chair of the Combating Terrorism Center at West Point.

On Tuesday, US President Donald Trump nominated him as US ambassador to Saudi Arabia. 

A fluent speaker of Arabic, Abizaid served as a general in the Arabian Gulf, Bosnian, Kosovo, Afghanistan and Iraq wars. With extensive experience of Middle Eastern affairs, he led the US Central Command — which covers the whole Middle East — during the Iraq War shortly after the US invasion in 2003 until 2007. 

As the US Central Command (USCENTCOM) commander, he oversaw US military operations across a 27-country region covering the Horn of Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, South and Central Asia and much of the Middle East. USCENTCOM commanders oversee an estimated 250,000 troops.

Abizaid graduated from the US Military Academy at West Point in 1973. He received an MA in Middle Eastern Studies from Harvard University, where his 100-page paper on Saudi Arabia’s defense policy was highly acclaimed. 

While in Jordan, Abizaid served as an Olmsted Scholar at the University of Jordan in Amman. 

Since retiring from the military, Abizaid has been a fellow of the Hoover Institution at Stanford University.

Abizaid’s appointment as ambassador requires Senate approval, but this is thought to be a formality as he is held in high regard in Washington.


Al-Ula Royal Commission launches second phase of university scholarship program

Updated 34 min 14 sec ago
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Al-Ula Royal Commission launches second phase of university scholarship program

  • High-quality education will make students ‘valuable assets’ in transformation of the region
JEDDAH: The Royal Commission for Al-Ula has launched the second phase of its overseas scholarship program, giving students the chance to study at universities in the US, UK, France and Australia.
The program is intended to broaden the horizons of Saudi students, creating more rounded graduates with wider experiences of foreign cultures and practices.
The students will also learn the languages of their host countries, which will aid them in later life depending on what path they choose, and encouraging interaction and exchanges between the Al-Ula region and the rest of the world.
Rami Al-Sakran, capabilities development manager for the commission, said the Al-Ula scholarship program was one of four strands in a community development plan.
“We have four different units, sector planning and business licensing so that covers economic development, with community engagement and human capability under the social development plan,” he told Arab News.
The second phase of the scholarship program will run for five years following the positive response to the first phase, which was launched last year. The second phase has been expanded to accommodate 300 students and is open to all genders.
Last September, 165 students were sent to the US, UK and France with Australia to focus on fields such as hospitality, tourism, agriculture, archaeology and heritage.
Many residents from the area had migrated to larger cities because of the lack of job opportunities, he said, so it was important to engage and employ locals first.
“We’ll flood the equation. We’ll see people coming in and our priority is the local community and to provide them with jobs. We want these jobs that we’ll create to be filled by the locals first.
“We’ve currently provided jobs, whether directly or indirectly, some of them temporary and others permanent. At Winter in Tantora, we have volunteers, ushers, drivers as this is seasonal but we’ve established a database and some jobs are permanent, whether they’re directly employed by our CEO or some contract.”
Al-Sakran said locals were key to the success of turning Al-Ula into a major tourist destination.
“Locals, locals, locals. Without the locals, we can’t succeed. We have a very transparent relationship, it’s a two-way street with them. We cooperate with them and communicate with them on every basis. We have a strong relationship with the governor of Al-Ula and we listen to the locals.
“Whether it was our social or economical development, as you can see Winter in Tantora has a major socio-economic impact on the area and ... the locals are working everywhere here and that’s what we want. It’s theirs. We’ll unveil it to the Kingdom ... that’s the idea, to make it a strong and significant destination for all.”