Woman wears wedding gown after fiance dies in Lion Air crash

In this photo taken on Sunday, Nov. 11, 2018, and released by Intan Syari, Indonesian Intan Syari poses in her wedding dress with a bouquet of flowers on the day of her planned wedding in Pangkal Pinang, Indonesia. (AP)
Updated 16 November 2018
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Woman wears wedding gown after fiance dies in Lion Air crash

  • Lion Air is one of Indonesia’s youngest airlines but has grown rapidly, flying to dozens of domestic and international destinations

JAKARTA, Indonesia: An Indonesian woman whose fiance died on a Lion Air flight that plunged into the sea was photographed in her wedding dress and professed her love for him on the day they were to have been married.
Intan Syari’s fiance, Dr. Rio Nanda Pratama, was among 189 people who were killed when the Boeing 737 crashed Oct. 29 shortly after taking off from Jakarta.
Syari and Pratama, both 26, had planned to get married Sunday. Pratama, who had attended a seminar in Jakarta, was on his way home to Pangkal Pinang for the wedding.
Syari said Pratama had joked before leaving that if he was late in returning, Syari should take photos in her wedding gown and send them to him.
“We were just joking at that time,” Syari told The Associated Press on Wednesday. “He asked me to still wear my wedding gown that he chose for me on our wedding day, put on beautiful makeup and hold a white rose bouquet, take good photos and send them to him.”
She said Pratama was her “first love” and they started dating 13 years ago.
On Sunday, she went ahead and took photos in the white wedding gown with a white satin head covering and a white rose bouquet in her hand, surrounded by relatives and friends.
“Although I actually feel grief that I cannot describe, I have to smile for you,” Syari wrote on Instagram. “I should not be sad, I have to stay strong as you always say to me, I love you, Rio Nanda Pratama.”
Investigators say sensors that help prevent planes from stalling were replaced on the Lion Air plane the day before its fatal flight and may have compounded other problems with the aircraft.
Body parts are still being recovered and searchers are continuing to hunt for the cockpit voice recorder.
Lion Air is one of Indonesia’s youngest airlines but has grown rapidly, flying to dozens of domestic and international destinations.


Need to vent some anger? Jordan opens ‘Axe Rage Rooms’

Updated 18 April 2019
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Need to vent some anger? Jordan opens ‘Axe Rage Rooms’

  • People can demolish old items as well as smash plates and glasses — but for the price of $17
  • So-called rage rooms have been opening up around the world

AMMAN: In an underground room in Amman, a small group of Jordanians swing giant hammers at an old television, computer and printer, wrecking the machines, and then hit a car windscreen, shattering the glass into tiny pieces.
In the “Axe Rage Rooms,” people can vent their anger and frustration by demolishing old items as well as smashing plates and glasses.
“This is simply a place to break things and vent,” co-founder and general manager Ala’din Atari said. “A place where people come when they’re looking for a new experience... walking into a room with various items which they can break.”
So-called rage rooms have opened around the world, drawing visitors who want let their hair down and unleash some anger.
At the “Axe Rage Rooms,” where the experience costs $17, participants wearing protective suits and helmets wrote the issues bothering them on a blackboard — “ex-girlfriends,” “boss” and “all boyfriends,” the words becoming the targets of their anger.
Atari said his venue, which has seen about 10 clients a day in the month since it opened, had a space for couples, where the pair enter two rooms separated by a reinforced glass window.
“I wanted to try something new and...it was great,” said Ayla Alqadi, 23, after chucking old kitchenware at the window — behind which stood a friend.
“I felt like I had extra energy, it was a way to channel all the negativity inside, everything you feel inside you can release here.”