World’s police chiefs gather in Dubai to discuss the future of crime fighting

The gathering is considered one of the most prominent police events in the world. (File/Shutterstock)
Updated 18 November 2018
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World’s police chiefs gather in Dubai to discuss the future of crime fighting

  • The event is being attended by 171 countries and 1,000 delegates
  • Global crime had become more complex and more international than ever in today’s digital age

DUBAI: Around 40 ministers and 85 police chiefs from around the world gathered in Dubai on Sunday to discuss innovation in policing as well as today’s major crime threats.

Interpol’s 87th General Assembly will enable 192 of its member-countries, including Saudi Arabia and the UAE, to work together to fight international crime.

“In the age of unprecedented information exchange, police around the world are increasingly facing new challenges,” said Kim Jong Yang, Interpol’s senior vice president, during the event’s opening ceremony.

“Gathering best practices within an international model, Interpol provides a neutral, well-connected platform. Global connectivity is something Interpol strives for among law-enforcement worldwide.”

With 171 countries attending and 1,000 delegates, the gathering is considered one of the most prominent police events in the world.

“Participants will discuss complex terrorism and crime threats affecting all of us and to address future challenges,” said Jurgen Stock, Secretary General of Interpol, during a press conference.

“It is quite clear all these phenomena cannot be fought in isolation. No country or region can fight these in isolation, so this strengthens our global fight against terrorism and crime.”

He said global crime had become more complex and more international than ever in today’s digital age. “We are talking about terrorist threats all over the world where we see terrorist groups being connected,” he said.

“The cyber environment has been adding an element [of] threat to our modern societies, in terms of how it helps terrorists conduct their criminal and terrorist activities. The main purpose is to ensure there are no safe havens for criminals.”
Since 1956, the Kingdom has been working with Interpol to combat transnational crime across the Middle East and beyond, with the country contributing towards some 40,000 foreign terrorist profiles in Interpol’s database.
The Interpol National Central Bureau (NCB) for Saudi Arabia, which is part of the Ministry of Interior, serves as a fundamental gateway for international investigations involving the Kingdom and its citizens.

Interpol Riyadh works regularly with all of the organization’s member-countries to locate fugitives to bring them to justice, among other tasks. “International police cooperation is important,” Stock said.

“Interpol’s database contains 93 million records and they are being checked up to 200 times a second.

This is just a snapshot of the activity of our member countries, which doesn’t include regional and global activities targeting all forms of crime by Interpol – every gap that remains provides opportunities for criminals to hide their activities so it’s important we strengthen this system.” 


Pakistan reopens airspace to civil aviation after India standoff

Updated 16 July 2019
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Pakistan reopens airspace to civil aviation after India standoff

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan opened its airspace to civil aviation on Tuesday, following months of restrictions imposed in the wake of a standoff with neighboring India.
“With immediate effect Pakistan airspace is open for all type of civil traffic on published ATS (Air Traffic Service) routes,” according to a so-called Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) published on the Pakistan Civil Aviation Authority’s website.
The move by Pakistan, which lies in the middle of a vital aviation corridor, offers a welcome break for international airlines after the airspace restrictions affected hundreds of commercial and cargo flights each day, adding to flight time for passengers and fuel costs for airlines.
India’s ministry of civil aviation said that after the lifting of the NOTAMS, there were no further restrictions on airspace in either country.
“Flights have started using the closed air routes, bringing a significant relief for airlines,” it said.
Pakistan closed its airspace in February after an attack by a Pakistan-based militant group in Indian-controlled Kashmir led to an armed standoff between the two nuclear-armed powers.
Both countries carried out aerial attacks over the other’s territory and warplanes fought a brief dogfight over the skies of the disputed Kashmir region during which an Indian fighter jet was shot down.
Partial operations at Pakistani airports resumed once the immediate crisis passed but restrictions continued to affect many international carriers using Pakistani airspace.
Pakistan’s announcement came hours after United Airlines Holdings Inc. said it was extending the suspension of its flights from the United States to Delhi and Mumbai in India until Oct. 26, citing continued restrictions of Pakistani airspace.