World’s police chiefs gather in Dubai to discuss the future of crime fighting

The gathering is considered one of the most prominent police events in the world. (File/Shutterstock)
Updated 18 November 2018
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World’s police chiefs gather in Dubai to discuss the future of crime fighting

  • The event is being attended by 171 countries and 1,000 delegates
  • Global crime had become more complex and more international than ever in today’s digital age

DUBAI: Around 40 ministers and 85 police chiefs from around the world gathered in Dubai on Sunday to discuss innovation in policing as well as today’s major crime threats.

Interpol’s 87th General Assembly will enable 192 of its member-countries, including Saudi Arabia and the UAE, to work together to fight international crime.

“In the age of unprecedented information exchange, police around the world are increasingly facing new challenges,” said Kim Jong Yang, Interpol’s senior vice president, during the event’s opening ceremony.

“Gathering best practices within an international model, Interpol provides a neutral, well-connected platform. Global connectivity is something Interpol strives for among law-enforcement worldwide.”

With 171 countries attending and 1,000 delegates, the gathering is considered one of the most prominent police events in the world.

“Participants will discuss complex terrorism and crime threats affecting all of us and to address future challenges,” said Jurgen Stock, Secretary General of Interpol, during a press conference.

“It is quite clear all these phenomena cannot be fought in isolation. No country or region can fight these in isolation, so this strengthens our global fight against terrorism and crime.”

He said global crime had become more complex and more international than ever in today’s digital age. “We are talking about terrorist threats all over the world where we see terrorist groups being connected,” he said.

“The cyber environment has been adding an element [of] threat to our modern societies, in terms of how it helps terrorists conduct their criminal and terrorist activities. The main purpose is to ensure there are no safe havens for criminals.”
Since 1956, the Kingdom has been working with Interpol to combat transnational crime across the Middle East and beyond, with the country contributing towards some 40,000 foreign terrorist profiles in Interpol’s database.
The Interpol National Central Bureau (NCB) for Saudi Arabia, which is part of the Ministry of Interior, serves as a fundamental gateway for international investigations involving the Kingdom and its citizens.

Interpol Riyadh works regularly with all of the organization’s member-countries to locate fugitives to bring them to justice, among other tasks. “International police cooperation is important,” Stock said.

“Interpol’s database contains 93 million records and they are being checked up to 200 times a second.

This is just a snapshot of the activity of our member countries, which doesn’t include regional and global activities targeting all forms of crime by Interpol – every gap that remains provides opportunities for criminals to hide their activities so it’s important we strengthen this system.” 


More than 100 separatists detained in Kashmir raids in pre-election crackdown

Updated 2 min 10 sec ago
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More than 100 separatists detained in Kashmir raids in pre-election crackdown

  • The move comes days after a suicide car bombing killed at least 40 Indian security personnel
  • The attack was claimed by Pakistan-based militant group Jaish-e-Mohammed

SRINAGAR/NEW DELHI: More than 100 separatists in Kashmir were detained in overnight raids, police officials said on Saturday, as part of a crackdown on groups that might cause trouble ahead of nationwide elections set to be held by May.
The move comes days after a suicide car bombing killed at least 40 Indian security personnel on Feb. 14. The Indian government has warned that it will use all options in its power to avenge the attack claimed by Pakistan-based militant group Jaish-e-Mohammed.
“The arrival of more troops and the arrests of leaders and activists of separatist groups is part of an election exercise undertaken to ensure free and fair elections,” said one senior police official in the state.
Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s Bharatiya Janata Party is set to seek re-election in nationwide polls that are due to be held by May.
“Anti-election campaigns will not be allowed and separatists will be detained to ensure free, fair and transparent elections in the state,” the police official said.
Last week’s attack has also raised tensions between nuclear-armed neighbors India and Pakistan, that both claim Kashmir in full but rule it in part. India blames Pakistan for harboring militant groups operating in Kashmir. Pakistan has repeatedly denied the allegation.
Following the attack, India retaliated by removing any trade privileges offered to Pakistan, and it is now preparing to send as many as ten thousand additional troops to the contested area, according to a letter from the country’s home ministry seen by Reuters.
“India will exercise all instruments at its command, whether it is diplomatic or otherwise,” India’s Finance Minister Arun Jaitley said in New Delhi late on Friday. “This isn’t a one-week battle. It’s to be undertaken in various forms.”
Islamabad in turn has warned it would respond with “full force” if attacked.
The overnight arrests in the state included those of many senior members of Jamaat-e-Islami (JeI), an Islamic organization that wants Kashmir to be independent from India.
The arrests led to violent scenes in parts of Kashmir, with stone-throwing protesters met by police firing tear gas.
JeI’s leader, Dr. Abdul Hamid Fayaz and Yasin Malik, the head of Jammu Kashmir Liberation Front (JKLF) that wants independence from both India and Pakistan, were among those detained.
A spokesman for India’s home ministry did not respond to a request for comment on the arrests or troop deployments.
Next week India’s Supreme Court is also expected to hear a petition attempting to remove an article in the country’s constitution that prevents non-residents from moving to Jammu and Kashmir, the Indian state that contains Muslim-majority Kashmir. If passed it could further escalate tensions in the region.
A spokesman for JeI said the arrests of its members were a “well designed ploy,” ahead of any such ruling.