US air strikes in Somalia kill 37 militants

The aftermath of a suicide bomb in the Somali capital, Mogadishu on October 1, 2018 and claimed by Al-Shabab, 37 of whose members the US military said it killed in its latest air strikes. (AFP)
Updated 20 November 2018
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US air strikes in Somalia kill 37 militants

  • The US military said the strikes were conducted in support of the Federal Government of Somalia
  • Last month, the US military said it had killed 60 Shabab fighters in a single air strike

WASHINGTON: US air strikes in Somalia killed an estimated 37 fighters from the militant group Al-Shabab, the US military said Tuesday.
The two air strikes were carried out Monday near Debatscile, the military’s Africa command said in a statement, adding that the “air strikes did not injure or kill any civilians.”
It said the first “precision strike” killed 27 militants in a “planned and deliberate action.” The second strike killed another 10 fighters.
The US military said the strikes were “conducted in support of the Federal Government of Somalia as it continues to degrade Al-Shabab.”
Last month, the US military said it had killed 60 Shabab fighters in a single air strike, the largest since an air raid on one of the group’s training camps that killed around 100 fighters in November 2017.
Air assaults and missile strikes have increased in recent months against Shabab, an Al-Qaeda affiliate fighting to overthrow the internationally backed Somali government in Mogadishu, which has the support of an African Union force.


Ninth lawmaker quits Britain’s opposition Labour Party

Updated 44 min 19 sec ago
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Ninth lawmaker quits Britain’s opposition Labour Party

  • Corbyn, a supporter of Palestinian rights and critic of the Israeli government, has previously been accused by some of failing to tackle anti-Semitism in the party. He denies the allegation

LONDON: British lawmaker Ian Austin resigned from the opposition Labour Party on Friday, the ninth person to do so this week, saying it was “broken” and had been taken over by the “hard left.”

Austin said he was appalled at the treatment of Jewish lawmakers who had taken a stand against anti-Semitism and that the “the party is tougher on the people complaining about anti-Semitism than it is on the anti-Semites.”

“The Labour Party has been my life, so this has been the hardest decision I have ever had to take, but I have to be honest and the truth is that I have become ashamed of the Labour Party under (leader) Jeremy Corbyn,” he told the Express and Star newspaper.

“I could never ask local people to make Jeremy Corbyn Prime Minister.”

Corbyn has promised to drive anti-Semitism out of the party.

Austin said he did not currently have any plans to join The Independent Group in parliament, launched by seven of his former Labour colleagues on Monday and since joined by an eighth as well as three former members of the governing Conservatives.

A Labour lawmaker since 2005 and a former government minister, Austin supports Prime Minister Theresa May’s Brexit deal and is not in favor of holding a second referendum, putting him at odds with the other Independent Group members.