Gulf ratings untarnished by growing GRE debt

The sovereign ratings of Gulf countries remain unaffected by recent and planned debt-raising activities of government-related entities. Above, an aerial view of Abu Dhabi Corniche. (Reuters)
Updated 21 November 2018
0

Gulf ratings untarnished by growing GRE debt

  • Head of equity research at Exotix Capital Hasnain Malik: Investors familiar with the Gulf fully expect debt issuance by governments and their related enterprises to increase
  • Hasnain Malik: The generally very strong financial position of sovereigns in the Gulf and their defensible exchange rates has provided a relative haven for global fixed income investors

LONDON: The sovereign ratings of Gulf countries remain unaffected for now by both the recent and planned debt-raising activities of government-related entities, according to S&P Global.
The agency published a research note on Tuesday following investor concerns about the implications of significant amounts of debt being raised by government-backed entities such as investment funds and oil companies.
Saudi Arabia’s Public Investment Fund (PIF) raised an $11 billion international syndicated loan in September this year, while in July, Saudi Aramco said it might consider acquiring a strategic stake in Saudi Basic Industries Corp. (Sabic) from PIF. This potential acquisition is likely to require funding of up to $70 billion, said S&P Global.
“So far, the level of GRE debt and the potential for these contingent liabilities — obligations that have the potential to materialize on a government’s balance sheet or more broadly affect its fiscal profile — being realized has not led to negative rating actions for Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) sovereigns,” the S&P report said.
“If contingent liabilities do materialize, they have the potential to negatively affect sovereign ratings,” it added, using Mozambique as an example of where the restructuring of a government-guaranteed GRE loan led to a downgrade of the sovereign rating in 2016.

 

Hasnain Malik, head of equity research at Exotix Capital, said that most investors anticipated the Gulf region would ramp up debt-raising activities in the near future.
“Investors familiar with the Gulf fully expect debt issuance by governments and their related enterprises to increase. This is in line with their stated strategies,” he said.
“The more the debt that is taken on by government-related enterprises, the more that it will be lumped together with debt taken out by the sovereign in order to assess overall risk. But this is nothing new. Past discussions of the overall debt position of ‘Dubai Inc’ or ‘Qatar Inc’ have grappled with the issue of explicit and implicit government guarantees,” he said.
Rating agency Moody’s said last month that the multibillion-dollar PIF loan demonstrated that Saudi Arabia had a “strong ability to raise alternative funding in the capital markets,” according to its Oct. 17 report.
It then warned that a “significant reliance on broader public- sector borrowing to fund the diversification and development agenda would over time increase contingent liability risks for the sovereign.”
Malik said the region had retained its appeal to investors so far despite the potential rising GRE debt.
“In what has been a tougher environment for emerging market debt this year, the generally very strong financial position of sovereigns in the Gulf and their defensible exchange rates has provided a relative haven for global fixed income investors,” he said.
“The imminent inclusion into JP Morgan’s mainstream global indices of debt will likely put the region closer to the center of the average emerging market fixed income investor,” he said.
S&P Global rates 24 GREs in the Gulf region, with most of the companies enjoying the same rating as the sovereign.

FASTFACTS

S&P Global rates 24 GREs in the Gulf region.


Huawei warns US patent curbs would hurt global tech

Updated 27 June 2019
0

Huawei warns US patent curbs would hurt global tech

  • US senator’s proposal comes amid mounting American action against Huawei
  • Huawei’s US sales of network gear evaporated after a congressional panel labeled the company a security threat in 2012

SHENZHEN, China: Chinese tech giant Huawei warned Thursday a US senator’s proposal to block the company from pursuing damages in patent courts would be a “catastrophe for global innovation.”
The proposal comes amid mounting US action against Huawei, the biggest maker of switching gear for phone carriers, amid tension over Beijing’s technology ambitions. The company has been devastated by the Trump administration’s decision to impose restrictions on its access to American chips for smartphones and other components and technology.
Disrupting Huawei’s access to US patent courts would threaten the intellectual property system that supports technology development, said Song Liping, the company’s chief legal officer.
The proposal by Sen. Marco Rubio, a Republican from Florida, followed reports Huawei Technologies Ltd. is asking for $1 billion from American phone carrier Verizon for use of the Chinese company’s patents.
“If such a legislative proposal were to be passed, it would be a catastrophe for global innovation. It would have terrible consequences,” Song said at a news conference. He said it would “break the foundation of IP protection.”
American officials accuse Huawei of facilitating Chinese spying, a charge the company denies, and see it as a growing competitive threat to US technology industries.
Huawei’s founder, Ren Zhengfei, said this month it has cut its project sales by $30 billion over the next two years due to curbs on access to American chips and other components. He said smartphone sales outside China will fall 40 percent.
Huawei’s US sales of network gear evaporated after a congressional panel labeled the company a security threat in 2012 and told phone carriers to avoid it. But the Chinese company has a patent portfolio it licenses to manufacturers and carriers.
Song gave no confirmation of how much Huawei wants from Verizon or the basis of its claims.
“Intellectual property litigations are matters that should be heard and ruled on by courts. They should not be politicized,” he said.
Huawei, founded in 1986, has China’s biggest corporate research and development budget at $15 billion in 2018. The company is a leader in developing next-generation telecoms technology.
On Wednesday, a US federal court jury in Texas ruled Huawei stole trade secrets from a Silicon Valley company but awarded no damages, saying the Chinese company didn’t benefit.
The jury rejected Huawei’s claims that Cnex Labs Inc. co-founder Yiren Huang stole its technology while he worked at a Huawei subsidiary.
Huawei’s head of intellectual property, Jason Ding, said the company was studying the verdict and deciding what to do next.
Asked about a report by Bloomberg News that some Huawei researchers had published papers with Chinese military personnel over the past decade, Song said the company wasn’t aware of its employees publishing research as private individuals.
“We don’t customize products or do research for the military,” said Song. “We are not aware of employees publishing papers. We don’t have projects of that kind.”