Regional pop art prints to go on sale at Sole DXB

The Library. (Courtesy of The Third Line Gallery)
Updated 11 December 2018
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Regional pop art prints to go on sale at Sole DXB

DUBAI: Dubai-based urban festival Sole DXB is set to return on Dec. 6 with an exciting line-up of musicians set to perform at the celebration of all things hip-hop, fashion, art and basketball.

This year, Dubai-based The Third Line art gallery will set up a shop at the event, selling limited-edition prints by regional artists Amir H. Fallah, Farah Al-Qasimi, Hassan Hajjaj, Lamya Gargash, Nima Nabavi and Sara Naim.

Hassan Hajjaj "The Narcicyst" 2013. (Supplied)

Dubbed The Library, the shop will also offer up exclusive collaborations with three regional designers, including furniture pieces by Local Industries, which was founded in 2011 by Palestinian architects Elias and Yousef Anastas, jewelry inspired by Bedouin culture by HOOKED|HKD and glass vessels by Dima Srouji, who works with traditional glassblowers from the West Bank village of Jaba’.

Srouji’s project aims to reactivate the dying industry of Palestinian glassblowing and features glass objects that look like spiky goats, transparent cacti and giant millipedes.

Farah Al Qasimi "Falcon Hospital" 2017. (Supplied)

For art lovers who are seeking cutting-edge wall decoration, The Library’s offering of limited-edition prints is set to be quite a draw, with prints of work by the so-called “Andy Warhol of Marrakech” Hassan Hajjaj going on sale.

Hajjaj has scored more than a few celebrity fans, with US pop icon Madonna posting photos of a fun photo shoot with the artist on her Instagram account in August.

The Third Line’s booth at Sole DXB isn’t the only reason fans of art and urban culture should check out the event — a stellar lineup of performers is also set to attract hip-hop fans from around the region.

Nima Nabavi "Pixel Print" 2018. (Supplied)

Rap legend Nas will take to the stage with his socially conscious brand of hip-hop and New York-based rap duo Lion Babe, made up of Lucas Goodman and singer Jillian Harvey, will also perform. Meanwhile, Dominican-American singer DaniLeigh and British grime artist Giggs will entertain the crowd, among a host of other performers.

Founded in 2005, The Third Line represents contemporary Middle Eastern artists locally, regionally and internationally and its shop, The Library, is just one step toward making regional art a tad more affordable.


Bong d’Or: Korean director wins Cannes’ top prize

Updated 25 May 2019
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Bong d’Or: Korean director wins Cannes’ top prize

  • French-Senegalese director Mati Diop’s “Atlantics" wins festival’s second place award, the Grand Prize
  • Belgian brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne shared the best director for “Young Ahmed”

CANNES, France: South Korean director Bong Joon-ho’s social satire “Parasite,” about a poor family of hustlers who find jobs with a wealthy family, won the Cannes Film Festival’s top award, the Palme d’Or, on Saturday.
The win for “Parasite” marks the first Korean film to ever win the Palme. In the festival’s closing ceremony, jury president Alejandro Inarritu said the choice had been “unanimous” for the nine-person jury.
The genre-mixing film had been celebrated as arguably the most critically acclaimed film at Cannes this year and the best yet from the 49-year-old director of “Snowpiercer” and “Okja.”
It was the second straight Palme victory for an Asian director. Last year, the award went to Japanese filmmaker Hirokazu Kore-eda’s “Shoplifters.”
Two years ago, Bong was in Cannes’ competition with “Okja,” a movie distributed in North America by Netflix. After it and Noah Baumbach’s “The Meyerowitz Stories” — another Netflix release — premiered in Cannes, the festival ruled that all films in competition needed French theatrical distribution. Netflix has since withdrawn from the festival on the French Riveira.
The festival’s second place award, the Grand Prize, went to French-Senegalese director Mati Diop’s “Atlantics.” Diop was the first black female director in competition at Cannes.
Belgian brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne shared the best director for “Young Ahmed.”
Best actor went to Antonio Banderas for Pedro Almodovar’s “Pain and Glory,” while best actress was won by British actress Emily Beecham for “Little Joe.”
Although few quibbled with the choice of Bong, some had expected Cannes to make history by giving the Palme to a female filmmaker for just the second time.
Celine Sciamma’s period romance “Portrait of a Lady on Fire” was the Palme pick for many critics this year, but it ended up with best screenplay.
In the festival’s 72-year history, only Jane Champion has won the prize in 1993, and she tied with Chen Kaige’s “Farewell My Concubine.”