Regional pop art prints to go on sale at Sole DXB

The Library. (Courtesy of The Third Line Gallery)
Updated 11 December 2018
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Regional pop art prints to go on sale at Sole DXB

DUBAI: Dubai-based urban festival Sole DXB is set to return on Dec. 6 with an exciting line-up of musicians set to perform at the celebration of all things hip-hop, fashion, art and basketball.

This year, Dubai-based The Third Line art gallery will set up a shop at the event, selling limited-edition prints by regional artists Amir H. Fallah, Farah Al-Qasimi, Hassan Hajjaj, Lamya Gargash, Nima Nabavi and Sara Naim.

Hassan Hajjaj "The Narcicyst" 2013. (Supplied)

Dubbed The Library, the shop will also offer up exclusive collaborations with three regional designers, including furniture pieces by Local Industries, which was founded in 2011 by Palestinian architects Elias and Yousef Anastas, jewelry inspired by Bedouin culture by HOOKED|HKD and glass vessels by Dima Srouji, who works with traditional glassblowers from the West Bank village of Jaba’.

Srouji’s project aims to reactivate the dying industry of Palestinian glassblowing and features glass objects that look like spiky goats, transparent cacti and giant millipedes.

Farah Al Qasimi "Falcon Hospital" 2017. (Supplied)

For art lovers who are seeking cutting-edge wall decoration, The Library’s offering of limited-edition prints is set to be quite a draw, with prints of work by the so-called “Andy Warhol of Marrakech” Hassan Hajjaj going on sale.

Hajjaj has scored more than a few celebrity fans, with US pop icon Madonna posting photos of a fun photo shoot with the artist on her Instagram account in August.

The Third Line’s booth at Sole DXB isn’t the only reason fans of art and urban culture should check out the event — a stellar lineup of performers is also set to attract hip-hop fans from around the region.

Nima Nabavi "Pixel Print" 2018. (Supplied)

Rap legend Nas will take to the stage with his socially conscious brand of hip-hop and New York-based rap duo Lion Babe, made up of Lucas Goodman and singer Jillian Harvey, will also perform. Meanwhile, Dominican-American singer DaniLeigh and British grime artist Giggs will entertain the crowd, among a host of other performers.

Founded in 2005, The Third Line represents contemporary Middle Eastern artists locally, regionally and internationally and its shop, The Library, is just one step toward making regional art a tad more affordable.


Iraq says goodbye to its beloved archaeologist Al-Gailani

Updated 21 January 2019
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Iraq says goodbye to its beloved archaeologist Al-Gailani

  • Al-Gailani was one of Iraq’s first women to excavate the country’s archaeological heritage
  • After the US-led invasion, Al-Gailani continued to travel to Iraq, determined to rescue its heritage even as the country convulsed with war

BAGHDAD: Iraq on Monday mourned the loss of Lamia Al-Gailani, a beloved archaeologist who helped rebuild the Baghdad museum after it was looted following the 2003 US-led invasion to oust Saddam Hussein.
Al-Gailani, who died in Amman, Jordan, on Friday at the age of 80, was one of Iraq’s first women to excavate the country’s archaeological heritage.
Relatives, colleagues, and cultural officials on Monday gathered at Baghdad’s National Museum, the country’s leading museum, to pay their respects before moving her remains to the Qadiriyyah mosque for prayers and later interment.
A devotee of her country’s heritage, Al-Gailani lent her expertise to restore relics stolen from the museum for its reopening in 2015. She also championed a new antiquities museum for the city of Basra, which opened in 2016.
“She was very keen to communicate on the popular level and make archaeology accessible to ordinary people,” said her daughter, Noorah Al-Gailani, who curates the Islamic civilizations collection at the Glasgow Museum in Scotland.
“It is a big loss, the passing of Dr. Lamia Al-Gailaini, who played a great role in the field of archaeology, even before 2003,” said the deputy minister of culture, Qais Hussein Rashid.
The restored collection at the National Museum included hundreds of cylinder seals, the subject of Al-Gailani’s 1977 dissertation at the University of London. These were engraved surfaces used to print cuneiform impressions and pictographic lore onto documents and surfaces in ancient Mesopotamia, now present-day Iraq.
Still, thousands of artefacts remain missing from the museum’s collection, and Al-Gailani bore the grief of watching her country’s rich heritage suffer unfathomable levels of looting and destruction in the years after Saddam’s ouster.
“I wish it was a nightmare and I could wake up,” she told the BBC in 2015, when Daesh militants bulldozed relics at the ancient Assyrian city of Nimrud near present-day Mosul.
Born in Baghdad in 1938, Al-Gailani studied at the University of Cambridge in Britain before finding work as a curator at the National Museum in 1960. It was her first job in archaeology, her daughter said.
She returned to Britain in 1970 to pursue advanced studies, and she made her home there. Still, she kept returning to her native country, connecting foreign academics with an Iraqi archaeological community that was struggling under the isolation of Saddam Hussein’s autocratic rule and the UN sanctions against him.
In 1999, she published “The First Arabs,” in Arabic, with the Iraqi archaeologist Salim Al-Alusi, on the earliest traces of Arab culture in Mesopotamia, in the 6th through 9th centuries.
She would bring copies of the book with her to Baghdad and sell them through a vendor on Mutanabbi Street, the literary heart of the capital, according to her daughter.
After the US-led invasion, Al-Gailani continued to travel to Iraq, determined to rescue its heritage even as the country convulsed with war.
At the time of her death, she was working with the Basra Museum to curate a new exhibit set to open in March, said Qahtan Al-Abeed, the museum director.
“She hand-picked the cylinder seals to display at the museum,” said Al-Abeed.