New Zealand govt rejects telco’s plan to use Huawei 5G equipment

The US is trying to persuade wireless companies and internet providers in allied countries to shun equipment made by Chinese telecom giant Huawei, citing cyber security risks. (AFP photo)
Updated 28 November 2018
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New Zealand govt rejects telco’s plan to use Huawei 5G equipment

  • The decision comes months after Australia banned the China’s firm for security reasons
  • It comes at a time when Western countries are increasingly worried about the rising influence of Chinese companies in the Asia Pacific region.
WELLINGTON: A government agency rejected Spark New Zealand’s proposal to use 5G equipment of China’s Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd. in its planned network citing significant national security risks, the telco said on Wednesday.
The decision by New Zealand’s Director-General of the Government Communications Security Bureau comes months after Australia banned the Chinese firm for the same reason. It comes at a time when Western countries are increasingly worried about the rising influence of Chinese companies in the Asia Pacific region.
Last week, the Wall Street Journal reported that the US government is trying to persuade wireless and Internet providers in allied countries to avoid telecommunications equipment from China’s Huawei Technologies.
Huawei did not immediately respond to a request for comment.
Earlier this year, neighboring Australia banned Huawei from supplying equipment for a 5G mobile network citing national security risks.
Australia expanded its national security rules in August to exclude telecommunication equipment suppliers that it believes have ties to foreign governments.
The New Zealand bureau’s decision means that Spark cannot implement or give effect to its proposal to use Huawei equipment in its planned 5G network, the company said in a statement.
However, Spark said it remains confident the decision will not affect its plans to launch 5G network by July 1, 2020.


Sri Lanka troops launch major hunt for militants linked to suicide attacks

Updated 22 min 40 sec ago
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Sri Lanka troops launch major hunt for militants linked to suicide attacks

  • Several Colombo suburbs were targeted by troops using emergency powers on arrests and detentions adopted after the April 21 attacks
  • Security forces have arrested scores of suspects in connection with the bombings and over what appeared to be organized violence against the island’s Muslim minority

COLOMBO: Sri Lanka’s military launched a major hunt Saturday for remnants of an militant group which carried out the Easter suicide bombings that killed 258 people, officials said.
Several Colombo suburbs were targeted by troops using emergency powers on arrests and detentions adopted after the April 21 attacks.
“Special cordon-and-search operations are under way in three areas just outside Colombo,” a military official told reporters.
Similar operations were also carried out in the country’s north-west, where anti-Muslim riots this month left one man dead and hundreds of Muslim-owned shops, homes and mosques destroyed.
Security forces have arrested scores of suspects in connection with the bombings and over what appeared to be organized violence against the island’s Muslim minority.
While authorities say the immediate militant threat has been blunted, President Maithripala Sirisena on Wednesday extended for one month the 30-day state of emergency imposed after the suicide bombings.
Sirisena said the move was to maintain “public security,” with the country still on edge after the attacks on three hotels and three churches that were blamed on a local militant group, the National Thowheeth Jama’ath (NTJ).
The Daesh group has also claimed a role in the attacks.
Christians make up 7.6 percent and Muslims 10 percent of mainly Buddhist Sri Lanka.