The Six: How to celebrate UAE National Day 

The UAE will mark National Day on Dec. 2, but the entire country begins celebrations on Nov. 28. Here are ways to join in the fun. (Supplied)
Updated 28 November 2018
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The Six: How to celebrate UAE National Day 

The UAE will mark National Day on Dec. 2, but the entire country begins celebrations on Nov. 28. Here are ways to join in the fun.

The big ticket

“This Is Zayed. This Is the UAE,” billed as this year’s main event on Dec. 2, is a visual show with performances by the Royal Philharmonic Concert Orchestra and traditional musicians at the Zayed Sports City Stadium in Abu Dhabi. 

Firework displays

The UAE’s skies will be lit up by multiple firework displays on the big day. Dubai’s La Mer is hosting one, with live music from various Arab stars, including Fouad Abdul Wahed and Mohammed Al-Shehhi.

Free concerts

Live concerts from various Arab icons such as Waleed Al-Shami and Hussain Al-Jassmi will be held in Dubai's Burj Park. The event is also free of charge. 

Beachside fun

For a less conventional way of marking the day, #WOWJBR is hosting a weekend full of beachside activities at Jumeirah Beach Residence  in Dubai.

Theme-park celebrations

Dubai Parks and Resorts has prepared numerous activities across all its theme parks, including building a four meter-long National Day mosaic out of Lego. And there will be heavily discounted admission starting at AED 47.

La Perle by Dragone

The eye-popping acrobatic performance created by Franco Dragone, known for his work with Cirque du Soleil, is slashing its ticket prices by half from Nov. 28 to Dec. 2. A must-see at The Atrium in Dubai. 

 


What We Are Reading Today: Notes on a Shipwreck by Davide Enia

Updated 22 February 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Notes on a Shipwreck by Davide Enia

The book is a moving firsthand account of migrant landings on the island of Lampedusa that gives voice to refugees, locals, and volunteers while also exploring a deeply personal father-son relationship. 

“The island of Lampedusa, as the Italian playwright and journalist Davide Enia explains in this quiet yet urgent memoir, is territorially European but belongs tectonically to nearby Africa,” states Steven Heighton in a review published in The New York Times. 

For some 20 years, migrants and refugees launching from Africa have been arriving on this remote, treeless outpost, hoping to travel on to the European mainland. 

“Structurally, the book attests that a sincere engagement with global crises can grow only from a soil of sympathy that’s local and personal,” Heighton added.

A reviewer commented on goodreads.com: “Enia reawakens our sense of wonder at the existential nature, the true terror and dangerousness inherent in the refugee journey by sea. And in the process, he reawakens our compassion.”