Alicia Keys to return to UAE for Dubai Jazz Festival

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American singer-songwriter Alicia Keys was announced Wednesday as the third and final festival headliner for the 17th edition of the Emirates Airline Dubai Jazz Festival in February. (AFP)
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American singer-songwriter Alicia Keys was announced Wednesday as the third and final festival headliner for the 17th edition of the Emirates Airline Dubai Jazz Festival in February. (Getty)
Updated 28 November 2018
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Alicia Keys to return to UAE for Dubai Jazz Festival

  • The 15-time Grammy Award-winning singer/songwriter is scheduled to return to the UAE after appearing in 2013
  • The Dubai Jazz Festival, which started in 2003, is known to bring some of the music industry’s biggest stars to the emirate

DUBAI: American singer-songwriter Alicia Keys was announced Wednesday as the third and final festival headliner for the 17th edition of the Emirates Airline Dubai Jazz Festival in February.
The 15-time Grammy Award-winning singer/songwriter is scheduled to return to the UAE to perform for the first time since her “Set the World on Fire Tour” in 2013. She will join the Northern Irish band Snow Patrol, who will be headlining the event on Feb. 20, and Jamiroquai, who will perform on Feb. 21.
Keys’ UAE gig will continue her love affair with the Middle East. The 37-year-old artist, along with her husband, producer Swizz Beatz, and two children, holidayed in Egypt in September this year. Keys posed in front of the pyramids, took a boat trip along the Nile, participated in Arabic lessons and learned local history, all of which she documented on her Instagram page.
The Dubai Jazz Festival, which started in 2003, is known to bring some of the music industry’s biggest stars to the emirate, even if what they play is not strictly jazz.

American singer-songwriter Alicia Keys is the third and final festival headliner for the 17th edition of the Emirates Airline Dubai Jazz Festival in February. (Getty)

Earlier this year, the 2018 edition saw John Legend, Duran Duran and Ricky Martin perform sold-out gigs, while 2017’s performers were Enrique Iglesias, Mariah Carey and Tom Jones.
Keys, best known for tracks such as “A Woman’s Worth,” “Fallin’,” “Girl on Fire” and “Empire State of Mind” with Jay-Z, was seen as a mentor last year on the US version of “The Voice,” winning the show with her contestant, Chris Blue.
The R&B singer, also an actress and best-selling author of “Tears for Water: Songbook of Poems and Lyrics,” has sold over 30 million records. Keys has often collaborated with big names in the industry, such as Kendrick Lamar, Eminem, Justin Timberlake and James Bay.
Tickets for Keys’ performance at Dubai Media City Amphitheater on Feb. 22 start from 350 dirhams ($95) and are on sale at Virgin Megastores and on the Dubai Jazz Festival website.


Film Review: Mowgli’s latest jungle run releases on Netflix

Updated 09 December 2018
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Film Review: Mowgli’s latest jungle run releases on Netflix

CHENNAI: Technology is not a bad thing, but when stretched to the extreme it can hamper films. “Mowgli: The Legend of the Jungle,” which was released on Netflix this week, seems to suffer on this precise point.

Directed by the Hollywood legend that is Andy Serkis, the film employs his trademark use of technology that records an actor’s performance in three dimensions then maps the digital character, in this case the animals of the jungle, over the top.

While he is famous for his performance-capture techniques, it can be distracting from the plot and a little bizarre to watch on screen as the all-star cast — Benedict Cumberbatch as Bengal tiger Shere Khan, Cate Blanchett as the snake Kaa and Christian Bale as the panther Bagheera — morph into animal form.

Disney’s 2016 computer animated remake of Rudyard Kipling’s work was a huge hit and Serkis’ effort pales in comparison, but the upside to this latest remake of Mowgli’s adventure is that it focuses on the boy-cub’s (played by Rohan Chand) interaction with other humans and does so delightfully.

According to an interview with The Associated Press, Serkis was deep into planning when Disney’s version was announced, and, although he knew the films would be quite different, there was still pressure to be first. Once that “went away” when Disney beat them to theaters, Serkis said, they decided to take the time they needed to refine the story and get the performances and the technology up to his standard.

The film follows Mowgli as he is captured by a hunter (played by Matthew Rhys) and taken to a neighboring village, where a kind woman (Frieda Pinto) nurses him and even sings him a lullaby. Ultimately, the plot boils down to a choice between two worlds — the jungle and the village — and the young boy must choose between the lesser of two evils.

Serkis’ work has an important message for audiences and shouts loud and clear about the dangers of expanding urban developments in countries like India. The forests are shrinking, says a character in the film, and perhaps this film will shed light on the need to save the wildlife therein.