Alicia Keys to return to UAE for Dubai Jazz Festival

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American singer-songwriter Alicia Keys was announced Wednesday as the third and final festival headliner for the 17th edition of the Emirates Airline Dubai Jazz Festival in February. (AFP)
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American singer-songwriter Alicia Keys was announced Wednesday as the third and final festival headliner for the 17th edition of the Emirates Airline Dubai Jazz Festival in February. (Getty)
Updated 28 November 2018
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Alicia Keys to return to UAE for Dubai Jazz Festival

  • The 15-time Grammy Award-winning singer/songwriter is scheduled to return to the UAE after appearing in 2013
  • The Dubai Jazz Festival, which started in 2003, is known to bring some of the music industry’s biggest stars to the emirate

DUBAI: American singer-songwriter Alicia Keys was announced Wednesday as the third and final festival headliner for the 17th edition of the Emirates Airline Dubai Jazz Festival in February.
The 15-time Grammy Award-winning singer/songwriter is scheduled to return to the UAE to perform for the first time since her “Set the World on Fire Tour” in 2013. She will join the Northern Irish band Snow Patrol, who will be headlining the event on Feb. 20, and Jamiroquai, who will perform on Feb. 21.
Keys’ UAE gig will continue her love affair with the Middle East. The 37-year-old artist, along with her husband, producer Swizz Beatz, and two children, holidayed in Egypt in September this year. Keys posed in front of the pyramids, took a boat trip along the Nile, participated in Arabic lessons and learned local history, all of which she documented on her Instagram page.
The Dubai Jazz Festival, which started in 2003, is known to bring some of the music industry’s biggest stars to the emirate, even if what they play is not strictly jazz.

American singer-songwriter Alicia Keys is the third and final festival headliner for the 17th edition of the Emirates Airline Dubai Jazz Festival in February. (Getty)

Earlier this year, the 2018 edition saw John Legend, Duran Duran and Ricky Martin perform sold-out gigs, while 2017’s performers were Enrique Iglesias, Mariah Carey and Tom Jones.
Keys, best known for tracks such as “A Woman’s Worth,” “Fallin’,” “Girl on Fire” and “Empire State of Mind” with Jay-Z, was seen as a mentor last year on the US version of “The Voice,” winning the show with her contestant, Chris Blue.
The R&B singer, also an actress and best-selling author of “Tears for Water: Songbook of Poems and Lyrics,” has sold over 30 million records. Keys has often collaborated with big names in the industry, such as Kendrick Lamar, Eminem, Justin Timberlake and James Bay.
Tickets for Keys’ performance at Dubai Media City Amphitheater on Feb. 22 start from 350 dirhams ($95) and are on sale at Virgin Megastores and on the Dubai Jazz Festival website.


Life lessons from inspirational women — Alexis

Music artist 'Alexis.' (Supplied)
Updated 19 February 2019
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Life lessons from inspirational women — Alexis

  • UAE-based singer-songwriter, Alexis just released her album “This Is Me”
  • She talks tolerance, proving yourself, and the power of words

DUBAI: The UAE-based singer-songwriter, who just released her album “This Is Me,” talks tolerance, proving yourself, and the power of words

I’m very demanding of myself, which is a contradiction, because I’m so understanding and accepting of the weaknesses of other people, but I’m not that kind to myself. But I don’t mind laughing at myself either.

 

I’ve been guilty, earlier in my career, of trying to force situations. Sometimes pushing is good, but allowing things to happen in their own time is also a valuable skill. It’s not necessarily about the destination; it’s the journey. And if you can allow yourself to enjoy the journey, you’ll get there eventually — perhaps in a better condition.

 

My father encouraged me to be an individual thinker. He’s a man who has roots in a very conservative, male-driven culture, but he was raised by a woman who wasn’t afraid to break the mold. He advised me that because of what I look like, and being a woman, I would always need to be more than just adequately prepared: “If you’re required to know two things for a job, when you walk in there you need to know four or six things.”

 

I know it’s probably just something parents tell their kids to help them get through difficult situations, but I think that “Sticks and stones may break your bones but words can never hurt you” thing is such nonsense. Words can hurt. They can cause incredible damage. It’s important for us to realize the impact of what we say, how we say it, and to whom. Words have power.

 

I handled my own business from the very beginning, so I found myself at 18 going into meetings with executives who were in their 40s and 50s. And of course I was a child to them. So having them look beyond the physical thing and realize that I was very serious about my work and knew what I was talking about was a challenge. It’s easy to see me as a fashion horse. It’s harder to see that I’m a worker. Get past the window dressing and I’ve got quality merchandise. But I survived life with older brothers. I think I can tackle anything at this point.

 

Men and women are equally capable, but in different ways. It’s a bit of a generalization, but we have to accept that different people have different methodologies.