Japan court extends Ghosn detention

(AFP)
Updated 30 November 2018
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Japan court extends Ghosn detention

  • A Tokyo court on Friday extended the detention of former Nissan chief Carlos Ghosn
  • The extension means Ghosn could remain in a Tokyo cell for another 10 days

TOKYO: A Tokyo court on Friday extended the detention of former Nissan chief Carlos Ghosn, local media said, after his arrest on allegations of financial misconduct that have shaken the auto industry.
The extension means Ghosn could remain in a Tokyo cell for another 10 days while prosecutors investigate allegations he under-reported his salary by millions of dollars over five years.
The 64-year-old tycoon was arrested on November 19 and prosecutors have already extended his detention once, while two of the companies he led -- Nissan and Mitsubishi Motors -- have voted to remove him.
The extension gives prosecutors until December 10 to decide whether to indict Ghosn on charges of under-reporting his salary. If he is indicted, he could then be released awaiting trial, or held in pre-trial detention.
Prosecutors could also choose to file additional charges against him, and with each charge they can seek to hold Ghosn for another 22 days.
Ghosn's detention even before charges have been officially filed against him has prompted some criticism abroad, particularly in France, where the executive holds citizenship.
On Thursday, the deputy head of the Tokyo prosecutor's office rejected the criticism, saying: "We do not unnecessarily keep people in custody for a long time."
"I do not criticise other countries' systems just because they are different," Shin Kukimoto added.
Ghosn, who denies the allegations against him, faces an array of claims involving hiding money and benefits he received while chairman of Nissan and head of an alliance between the Japanese firm, Mitsubishi Motors and France's Renault.


UAE gives 6,800 investors permanent residency under new ‘Golden Card’ system

Updated 21 May 2019
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UAE gives 6,800 investors permanent residency under new ‘Golden Card’ system

  • Permanent residency will be granted to foreign investors after they invest a combined $27 billion in the Gulf state
  • The UAE cabinet also approved providing renewable 10-year visas to foreigners with investments in the UAE of at least 10 million dirhams

DUBAI: The United Arab Emirates said on Tuesday it will grant 6,800 foreign investors permanent residency under a new “Golden Card” system after they invested a combined 100 billion dirhams ($27 billion) in the Gulf state.
Typically, foreigners have renewable visas valid for only a few years, often tied to employment, but the government announced plans last year to ease its visa policy.
“We launched a new ‘Golden Card’ system to grant permanent residency to investors and exceptional doctors, engineers, scientists and artists,” Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al-Maktoum, the ruler of Dubai and the vice president and prime minister of the UAE, said in a tweet on Tuesday.
“The first batch of 6,800 investors with 100 billion dirhams worth of investments will be granted the ‘Golden Card.’“
In May last year the Gulf Arab state announced plans to grant long-term permits to investors, senior scientists and entrepreneurs, in an effort to support its economy and real estate market, which had been hurt by low oil prices, but had not mentioned the Golden Card.
Economic growth has slowed since a slump in oil prices in 2014 and white-collar professionals are seeing stagnant or even falling employment.
“The permanent residency ‘Golden Card’ will be granted to exceptional talents and everyone who positively contributes to the success story of the UAE,” Sheikh Mohammed said his tweet.
Last year, the UAE cabinet also approved providing renewable 10-year visas to foreigners with investments in the UAE of at least 10 million dirhams, if non-real estate assets account for at least 60 percent of the total. Investors can bring spouses and children into the country.
It also approved five-year residency to owners of UAE real estate worth at least 5 million dirhams.