Amazon briefly edges out Apple for most valuable company

Updated 04 December 2018
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Amazon briefly edges out Apple for most valuable company

  • Amazon rose by 4.7 percent at one point, putting its market capitalization at $865.0 billion
  • Amazon’s lead lasted only a few seconds. At the close, Apple was back on top with a 3.49 percent increase in its stock that put its total value at $877 billion

SAN FRANCISCO, US: Amazon.com briefly became the most valuable company on Wall Street in intraday trade on Monday, days after Microsoft Corp. dethroned long-time leader Apple Inc.
Amazon rose by 4.7 percent at one point, putting its market capitalization at $865.0 billion. At the same time, Apple traded up 2.1 percent, giving it a market capitalization of $864.8 billion.
Microsoft, which on Friday closed above Apple’s market capitalization for the first time in eight years, was up 0.9 percent, leaving its stock market value at $859.0 billion, third in the group.
Amazon’s lead lasted only a few seconds. At the close, Apple was back on top with a 3.49 percent increase in its stock that put its total value at $877 billion. It was followed by Amazon, up 4.86 percent with a market capitalization of $866.6 billion, and then Microsoft, up 1.08 percent and a stock market value of $860.4 billion.
The tight race between the trio of high-powered technology stocks coincided with a broad stock market rally after the United States and China agreed on a temporary truce in their ongoing trade dispute.
Apple in August became the first US publicly listed company to reach a $1 trillion market capitalization, but its share price has fallen sharply in recent months as investors worried that demand for iPhones was losing steam.
Its market capitalization overtook Microsoft’s in 2010 as Microsoft struggled with slow demand for personal computers, due in part to the explosion of smartphones like the iPhone.
Amazon’s stock has recovered most of the ground it lost after the online retailer in October forecast disappointing sales for the holiday quarter.
Although it is down about 13 percent from its Sept. 4 record-high close, in the year to date Amazon’s stock is up 51 percent, compared with a 31 percent rise for Microsoft and Apple’s 9 percent increase.


UK core pay growth strongest in nearly 11 years, but jobs growth slows

Data showed the unemployment rate remained at 3.8 percent as expected. (Shutterstock)
Updated 16 July 2019
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UK core pay growth strongest in nearly 11 years, but jobs growth slows

  • Core earnings have increased by 3.6 percent annually, beating the median forecast of 3.5 percent
  • The unemployment rate fell by 51,000 to just under 1.3 million

LONDON: British wages, excluding bonuses, rose at their fastest pace in more than a decade in the three months to May, official data showed, but there were some signs that the labor market might be weakening. Core earnings rose by an annual 3.6 percent, beating the median forecast of 3.5 percent in a Reuters poll of economists. Including bonuses, pay growth also picked up to 3.4 percent from 3.2 percent, stronger than the 3.1 percent forecast in the poll. Britain’s labor market has been a silver lining for the economy since the Brexit vote in June 2016, something many economists attribute to employers preferring to hire workers that they can later lay off over making longer-term commitments to investment. The pick-up in pay has been noted by the Bank of England which says it might need to raise interest rates in response, assuming Britain can avoid a no-deal Brexit. Tuesday’s data showed the unemployment rate remained at 3.8 percent as expected, its joint-lowest since the three months to January 1975. The number of people out of work fell by 51,000 to just under 1.3 million. But the growth in employment slowed to 28,000, the weakest increase since the three months to August last year and vacancies fell to their lowest level in more than a year. Some recent surveys of companies have suggested employers are turning more cautious about hiring as Britain approaches its new Brexit deadline of Oct. 31. Both the contenders to be prime minister say they would leave the EU without a transition deal if necessary. A survey published last week showed that companies were more worried about Brexit than at any time since the decision to leave the European Union and they planned to reduce investment and hiring. “The labor market continues to be strong,” ONS statistician Matt Hughes said. “Regular pay is growing at its fastest rate for nearly 11 years in cash terms and its quickest for over three years after taking account of inflation.” The BoE said in May it expected wage growth of 3 percent at the end of this year.