‘Star Is Born,’ ‘Mary Poppins’ could lead Golden Globe nominations

Despite its many songs, “A Star Is Born,” starring Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper, is competing in the Globes’ dramatic categories. (File/AFP)
Updated 06 December 2018
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‘Star Is Born,’ ‘Mary Poppins’ could lead Golden Globe nominations

  • The Golden Globes will be held in Beverly Hills on Jan. 6
  • Andy Samberg and Sandra Oh will be hosting the awards ceremony

NEW YORK: Nominees for the 76th annual Golden Globes Awards will be announced Thursday morning, and both “A Star Is Born” and “Mary Poppins Returns” could be in for a big morning.
The Hollywood Foreign Press Association will unveil their nominations beginning at 8:15 a.m. EST. The nominations will be livestreamed on the Globes’ official Facebook page and the group’s website. The top categories will be carried live on NBC.
Presenters will include Terry Crews, Danai Gurira, Leslie Mann and Christian Slater.
Despite its many songs, “A Star Is Born” is competing in the Globes’ dramatic categories. Two Oscar favorites, “Green Book” and “The Favourite,” are slotting in as comedies, where the Disney musical “Mary Poppins” could pile up nominations.
Curiously, the Hollywood Foreign Press doesn’t consider foreign-language films eligible for best film, so Alfonso Cuaron’s Netflix drama “Roma” will be left out of the Globes’ top category.
On the TV side, Amazon’s “Homecoming” and Ryan Murphy’s “Pose” may score nominations in their first eligible awards show.
The Golden Globes will be held in Beverly Hills on Jan. 6. The HFPA on Wednesday announced that Andy Samberg and Sandra Oh will host.


What We Are Reading Today: Notes on a Shipwreck by Davide Enia

Updated 22 February 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Notes on a Shipwreck by Davide Enia

The book is a moving firsthand account of migrant landings on the island of Lampedusa that gives voice to refugees, locals, and volunteers while also exploring a deeply personal father-son relationship. 

“The island of Lampedusa, as the Italian playwright and journalist Davide Enia explains in this quiet yet urgent memoir, is territorially European but belongs tectonically to nearby Africa,” states Steven Heighton in a review published in The New York Times. 

For some 20 years, migrants and refugees launching from Africa have been arriving on this remote, treeless outpost, hoping to travel on to the European mainland. 

“Structurally, the book attests that a sincere engagement with global crises can grow only from a soil of sympathy that’s local and personal,” Heighton added.

A reviewer commented on goodreads.com: “Enia reawakens our sense of wonder at the existential nature, the true terror and dangerousness inherent in the refugee journey by sea. And in the process, he reawakens our compassion.”