Trump expected to pick former Fox News anchor as next UN ambassador

In this Aug. 9, 2017, file photo, State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert speaks during a briefing at the State Department in Washington. (AP)
Updated 07 December 2018
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Trump expected to pick former Fox News anchor as next UN ambassador

  • Nauert was a reporter for Fox News Channel before she became State Department spokeswoman under former secretary Rex Tillerson

WASHINGTON: President Donald Trump is expected to nominate State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert to be the next US ambassador to the United Nations.
Two administration officials confirmed Trump’s plans. A Republican congressional aide said the president was expected to announce his decision by tweet on Friday morning. The officials were not authorized to speak publicly before Trump’s announcement.
Trump has previously said Nauert was under serious consideration to replace Nikki Haley, who announced in October that she would step down at the end of this year.
Trump has been known to change course on staffing decisions in the past.
Nauert was a reporter for Fox News Channel before she became State Department spokeswoman under former secretary Rex Tillerson.


Japan probe seems to have landed on asteroid: space agency

Updated 5 min 31 sec ago
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Japan probe seems to have landed on asteroid: space agency

TOKYO: A Japanese probe that aims to examine a distant asteroid for clues about the origin of the solar system appears to have landed successfully Friday, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA said.
“We confirmed data communication with the probe recovered after the touchdown, and it seems that touchdown was successful, but we have to analyze various data that we are receiving step by step... before the final confirmation,” JAXA spokeswoman Chizato Ikuta told AFP.
Such confirmation is expected in a few hours given the distance between the probe and Earth.
A live webcast of the control room showed dozens of JAXA staff members nervously monitoring data ahead of the touchdown before exploding into applause after receiving a signal from the probe, Hayabusa2, that it had landed.
Another JAXA spokeswoman, Azusa Yabe, said they had received data showing a change of speed and direction — that the probe had changed from descending to rising back toward its orbiting position.
This indicates a successful landing but the agency still needs to check various other parts of the probe to be able to confirm.
The probe is scheduled to fire a “bullet” into the asteroid’s surface to stir up surface matter, which the probe will then collect for analysis back on Earth.
The asteroid is thought to contain relatively large amounts of organic matter and water from some 4.6 billion years ago when the solar system was born.
Scientists hope the samples may provide answers to some fundamental questions about life and the universe, including whether elements from space helped give rise to life on Earth.