Israel accepted into global financial watchdog group

Israel has become the newest member to the Financial Action Task Force. (Screengrab)
Updated 10 December 2018
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Israel accepted into global financial watchdog group

  • Israel says Monday that its acceptance into the group will allow it to take an active role in global policy-making on the issues
  • The group has in the past given Israel’s archenemy Iran ultimatums over terrorism funding

JERUSALEM: Israel says it has been accepted as a member in a global money laundering and terrorism financing watchdog group.
The Financial Action Task Force is an intergovernmental group of some 35 countries based in Paris that sets international standards on terror financing and money laundering.
Israel says Monday that its acceptance into the group will allow it to take an active role in global policy-making on the issues.
In a statement, the FATF said Israel’s “experience and perspective will make a valuable contribution to our work to prevent the misuse of the financial system.”
The group has in the past given Israel’s archenemy Iran ultimatums over terrorism funding, warning of deeper economic isolation if it doesn’t comply.


Archaeologists find mosque from when Islam arrived in holy land

Updated 18 July 2019
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Archaeologists find mosque from when Islam arrived in holy land

  • Authorities estimate the mosquer dates back to the 7th to 8th centuries
  • Rare to find house of prayer so ancient whose congregation is likely to have been local farmers

RAHAT, Israel: Archaeologists in Israel have discovered the remains of one of the world’s oldest rural mosques, built around the time Islam arrived in the holy land, they said on Thursday.
The Israel Antiquities Authority estimates that the mosque, uncovered ahead of new construction in the Bedouin town of Rahat in the Negev desert, dates back to the 7th to 8th centuries.
There are large mosques known to be from that period in Jerusalem and in Makkah but it is rare to find a house of prayer so ancient whose congregation is likely to have been local farmers, the antiquities authority said.
Excavated at the site were the remains of an open-air mosque — a rectangular building, about the size of a single-car garage, with a prayer niche facing south toward Makkah.
“This is one of the earliest mosques known from the beginning of the arrival of Islam in Israel, after the Arab conquest of 636 C.E.,” said Gideon Avni of the antiquities authority.
“The discovery of the village and the mosque in its vicinity are a significant contribution to the study of the history of the country during this turbulent period.”