Rohingya refugees exhibit craftsmanship in Bangladesh

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The event is aimed at promoting a livelihood and craftsmanship of the displaced and distraught community.
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The event is aimed at promoting a livelihood and craftsmanship of the displaced and distraught community.
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The event is aimed at promoting a livelihood and craftsmanship of the displaced and distraught community.
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The event is aimed at promoting a livelihood and craftsmanship of the displaced and distraught community.
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The event is aimed at promoting a livelihood and craftsmanship of the displaced and distraught community.
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The event is aimed at promoting a livelihood and craftsmanship of the displaced and distraught community.
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The event is aimed at promoting a livelihood and craftsmanship of the displaced and distraught community.
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The event is aimed at promoting a livelihood and craftsmanship of the displaced and distraught community.
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The event is aimed at promoting a livelihood and craftsmanship of the displaced and distraught community.
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The event is aimed at promoting a livelihood and craftsmanship of the displaced and distraught community.
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The event is aimed at promoting a livelihood and craftsmanship of the displaced and distraught community.
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The event is aimed at promoting a livelihood and craftsmanship of the displaced and distraught community.
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The event is aimed at promoting a livelihood and craftsmanship of the displaced and distraught community.
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The event is aimed at promoting a livelihood and craftsmanship of the displaced and distraught community.
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The event is aimed at promoting a livelihood and craftsmanship of the displaced and distraught community.
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The event is aimed at promoting a livelihood and craftsmanship of the displaced and distraught community.
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The event is aimed at promoting a livelihood and craftsmanship of the displaced and distraught community.
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The event is aimed at promoting a livelihood and craftsmanship of the displaced and distraught community.
Updated 10 December 2018
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Rohingya refugees exhibit craftsmanship in Bangladesh

  • Sale proceeds will be given to Rohingya
  • UN described Myanmar military crackdown as ‘ethnic cleansing’

DHAKA: An exhibition showcasing handicrafts from members of the Rohingya community living in refugee camps was held in Bangladesh on Monday.

Hundreds of thousands of people from the Rohingya Muslim minority have arrived in Bangladesh since a military crackdown in neighboring Myanmar last year triggered an exodus, straining resources in the impoverished country.

The event, jointly organized by the UNHCR and the International Union for Conservation of Nature, is aimed at promoting a livelihood and craftsmanship of the displaced and distraught community.

“I learnt how to make different things out of bamboo from my mother when I was a child,” Khodeza Khatun told Arab News. The 27-year old, who lives in the Kutupalang refugee camp in Cox’s Bazar, said her mother made household items from bamboo and sold them to neighbors.

“That little traditional craftsmanship from my  early age has opened a new avenue of my life through which I can now earn a little money, even in this camp life."

Many of those who fled Myanmar hailed from western Rakhine state, where the UN says the military carried out an ethnic cleansing operation against the Rohingya.

The Rohingya are widely regarded in Myanmar as illegal immigrants from Bangladesh, even though many have lived there for generations.

“When I was in Rakhine, I used to prepare my own bamboo fishing baskets and some bamboo pots to use during the irrigation of my paddy field. The skill which I acquired from my elders has now become a source of inspiration for many of my fellow refugees in the camp,” said Jomir Hossain, 55, who also lives in the

Kutupalang refugee camp.

Almost two dozen men and women showcased their work, displaying baskets, bags and wall mats.

“We identified the Rohingya artisans and they produced the goods by themselves. We engaged an artist who worked with them and helped them improve the design,” Raquibul Amin, IUCN country manager, told Arab News.

He and his colleagues noticed the Rohingya’s craftsmanship while working on another project.

“We thought it would be very nice if we could show their talent to the humanitarian community in Cox’s Bazar. This recognition of their skill will be useful for the Rohingya people when they go back to their country,” he said.

The sale proceeds will be given back to the artisans but Amin said other humanitarian organizations could take up this idea to help improve the living standards of Rohingya refugees.  

“We don’t have enough scope to earn  here in the camp since we are not allowed to go out. But by preparing these handicrafts and selling them to the outside market, we can fight the poverty cycle to some extent,” said Hossain.

The UNHCR is also interested in  continuing its support for the Rohingya in this way.

“We will keep on finding talented men and women among the refugees and, at the same time, we will keep on finding markets for selling these goods through our partner organizations,” Fhiras Al-khateeb, UNHCR spokesman at Cox’s Bazar, told Arab News.


China suspends Canadian meat imports amid Huawei dispute

Updated 26 June 2019
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China suspends Canadian meat imports amid Huawei dispute

  • The latest action against Canada comes as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau heads to Japan for the G-20 summit
  • Before acting against Canadian meat, China previously stopped importing certain Canadian products like canola

TORONTO: China is suspending all meat imports from Canada amid their dispute over the Canadian detention of a top executive at the Chinese tech company Huawei.
The Chinese Embassy in Ottawa said in a statement on its website Tuesday that the move follows Chinese customs inspectors’ detection of residue from a restricted feed additive, called ractopamine, in a batch of Canadian pork products. It is permitted in Canada but banned in China.
“China has taken urgent preventive measures and requested the Canadian government to suspend the issuance of certificates for meat exported to China,” the statement said.
Meng Wanzhou, the Huawei CFO and daughter of the company’s founder, was arrested Dec. 1 in Canada at the request of US authorities, who want to try her on fraud charges.
China then detained two Canadians and sentenced another to death in an apparent attempt to pressure for her release.
The latest action against Canada comes as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau heads to Japan for the G-20 summit. US President Donald Trump is expected to meet with his Chinese counterpart amid trade talks.
Meng’s arrest set off a diplomatic furor among the three countries, complicating high-stakes US-China trade talks and severely damaging Beijing’s relations with Ottawa. Canada wants Trump to speak on behalf of Canada to Chinese President Xi Jinping. The Chinese have refused to talk to senior Canadian government officials, including Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland. Trudeau had hoped to meet with Xi at the G-20 but that appears unlikely.
Before acting against Canadian meat, China previously stopped importing certain Canadian products like canola.
Justine Lesage, a spokeswoman for Canada’s agriculture minister, said in a statement that the Canadian Food and Inspection Agency identified an issue involving inauthentic export certificates that could affect the export of pork and beef products to China.
She said the agency has “taken measures to address this issue and is continuing to work closely with industry partners and Chinese officials.”
“The Canadian food system is one of the best in the world and we are confident in the safety of Canadian products and Canadian exports,” she said.