US energy secretary meets Saudi counterpart after OPEC cuts

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Saudi Arabia’s energy minister, Khalid Al-Falih, met with his US counterpart, Rick Perry, after OPEC defied US pressure to cut oil production in a bid to prop up prices. (Twitter/@Khalid_AlFalih)
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Saudi Arabia’s energy minister, Khalid Al-Falih, met with his US counterpart, Rick Perry, after OPEC defied US pressure to cut oil production in a bid to prop up prices. (Twitter/@Khalid_AlFalih)
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Saudi Arabia’s energy minister, Khalid Al-Falih, met with his US counterpart, Rick Perry, after OPEC defied US pressure to cut oil production in a bid to prop up prices. (Twitter/@Khalid_AlFalih)
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Saudi Arabia’s energy minister, Khalid Al-Falih, met with his US counterpart, Rick Perry, after OPEC defied US pressure to cut oil production in a bid to prop up prices. (Twitter/@Khalid_AlFalih)
Updated 10 December 2018
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US energy secretary meets Saudi counterpart after OPEC cuts

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia’s energy minister held talks Monday with US Energy Secretary Rick Perry, after the Kingdom and its allies defied US pressure to cut oil production in a bid to prop up prices.
They discussed the “state of the oil market” and energy cooperation between the two countries during a meeting in eastern Dhahran city, the minister, Khalid Al-Falih, said on Twitter.
Perry tweeted that he discussed the need for “open, free, and fair markets with the Saudis.”
OPEC members and 10 other oil producing nations, including Russia, on Friday agreed to cut output by 1.2 million barrels a day from January in a bid to reverse recent falls in prices.
The decision came even as US President Donald Trump demanded that the cartel boost output in order to push prices down.
But Al-Falih shrugged off the pressure last week, saying “we don’t need permission from anyone to cut” production.
The US “is not in a position to tell us what to do,” he told reporters ahead of Friday’s OPEC meeting in Vienna.
Last week, for the first time in decades, the United States — which is not a member of OPEC — was a net exporter of crude oil and petroleum products.
It was the latest sign of how the shale boom has lifted the US standing on global petroleum markets, prompting talk of “energy dominance” by Trump.
Perry’s visit to Dhahran came as Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman unveiled state oil giant Aramco’s plan for a new energy megaproject in the area known as the King Salman Energy Park (SPARK).
The energy park is expected to attract an initial investment of $1.6 billion, Aramco said.


Gulf tanker incidents to raise shippers’ costs, cut traffic

In this picture taken on Tuesday, April 7, 2015, and released by the semi-official Fars News Agency, Iranian warship Alborz, foreground, prepares before leaving Iran's waters, at the Strait of Hormuz. (AP)
Updated 11 min 45 sec ago
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Gulf tanker incidents to raise shippers’ costs, cut traffic

  • Many of the 2,000 companies operating ships in the region have ordered their vessels to transit the Strait of Hormuz only during the daylight hours and at high speed

WASHINGTON: Recent seizures and attacks aimed at oil tankers in the Strait of Hormuz will raise insurance rates for shipping companies and, if unchecked, reduce tanker traffic in the vital waterway, according to energy experts.
Britain’s foreign secretary said that Iranian authorities on Friday seized two ships, one flying under the British flag, the other registered in Liberia. The events occurred in a passageway that carries one-fifth of the world’s crude exports.
“If this kind of problem continues, you might see people start to shy away from the (Persian) Gulf or try to reflag — not be a British tanker,” said energy economist Michael Lynch.
The near-term impact will fall most heavily on the shipping industry in the form of higher insurance rates, said Lynch, who is the president of Strategic Energy & Economic Research Inc.
Richard Nephew, a Columbia University researcher who wrote a book on sanctions, also believes the tanker seizures could create “a real risk premium” for companies that operate in the Gulf and insurers that underwrite them.
“Certainly we’ve seen concern with this in the past on sanctions grounds, and I would imagine security groups would be a far more complicating element,” Nephew said.
On Friday, Iran’s Revolutionary Guard said it took the British tanker Stena Impero to an Iranian port because it allegedly violated international shipping regulations. An Iranian news agency said the Liberian-flagged Mesdar was briefly detained and then released after being told to comply with environmental rules.
The seizures marked a sharp escalation of tension in the region that began rising when the Trump administration withdrew from a 2015 nuclear deal with Iran and imposed severe restrictions on Iranian oil exports and other sanctions.

FASTFACT

The British navy seized Iran’s Grace 1 tanker in Gibraltar on July 4 on suspicion of smuggling oil to Syria in breach of EU sanctions.

Many of the 2,000 companies operating ships in the region have ordered their vessels to transit the Strait of Hormuz only during the daylight hours and at high speed. But only a handful of the companies have halted bookings.
The tensions in the Gulf also pushed oil prices slightly higher. Brent crude, the international standard, rose 0.9 percent to $62.47 a barrel on Friday, while benchmark US crude gained 0.6 percent to settle at $55.63.
There’s a long history of shippers enduring threats in the region.
“There have always been little problems around the Gulf where people will say, ‘You’re in our territorial waters,’ but usually that doesn’t go so far as the seizure of tankers,” Lynch said.