Indian rupee, bonds slump after cenbank governor’s resignation

In this file photo taken on April 1, 2014, the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) logo is seen on the main entrance gate of the RBI headquarters in Mumbai. (AFP)
Updated 11 December 2018
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Indian rupee, bonds slump after cenbank governor’s resignation

  • The RBI governor resigned abruptly after a months-long tussle over policy with the government

MUMBAI: India’s rupee and bonds plunged following Reserve Bank of India Governor Urjit Patel’s unexpected resignation after market hours on Monday shocked investors.
Concerns about likely mixed results from crucial state elections later on Tuesday also kept traders wary.
The Indian rupee came off earlier lows at 72.1350 to the dollar after opening at 72.46, but was sharply lower from its close of 71.35 on Monday.
The 10-year benchmark bond yield rose to 7.64 percent from 7.59 percent at the previous close.
The broader NSE stock index opened down 1.3 percent but recovered some of its losses and was 0.9 percent lower.
Investors will await state election results for further trading cues during the day.
The RBI governor resigned abruptly after a months-long tussle over policy with the government that has raised concerns about the central bank’s independence as a national election nears.


US trade negotiators to visit China for fresh round of talks

Updated 21 March 2019
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US trade negotiators to visit China for fresh round of talks

  • Washington and Beijing are battling over the final shape of a trade deal
  • American officials are demanding profound changes to Chinese industrial policy

BEIJING: US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin will visit China on March 28-29 for a fresh round of talks aimed at resolving the bruising trade war, the Chinese commerce ministry said Thursday.
After their visit, Chinese Vice Premier Liu He will head to the United States in April to continue the negotiations, ministry spokesman Gao Feng said at a press briefing.
Washington and Beijing are battling over the final shape of a trade deal, with American officials demanding profound changes to Chinese industrial policy.
President Donald Trump warned Wednesday that US tariffs on Chinese imports could remain in place for a “substantial period,” dampening hopes that an agreement would see them lifted soon.
Over the last eight months, the United States and China have slapped tariffs on more than $360 billion in two-way goods trade, weighing on the manufacturing sectors in both countries.
On Friday, China’s rubber-stamp parliament approved a foreign investment law to strengthen protections for intellectual property — a central US grievance — but critics said the bill was rammed through without sufficient time for input from businesses.