UAE's Hussein Al Jasmi to perform at the Vatican's annual Christmas concert

Hussain Al Jasmi, Emirati Musician and UN Goodwill Ambassador (File/AFP)
Updated 11 December 2018
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UAE's Hussein Al Jasmi to perform at the Vatican's annual Christmas concert

  • Al Jasmi is the first Emirati artist to perform at prestigious Vatican event
  • The concert will be broadcast worldwide on Christmas day

DUBAI: Emirati singer Hussain Al Jasmi is scheduled to perform at the annual Christmas concert in the Vatican on Saturday.

Al Jasmi, a UN Goodwill Ambassador, will become the first Arab artist to perform at the event. His participation in the concert will be alongside the Grand Orchestra under the direction of Maestro Renato Serio.

 “I have always been pleased to contribute to charitable work in order to create an environment conducive to a dignified life, respect, equality and peace, the values that we have grown on and inherited from the late Shaikh Zayed.” Al Jasmi wrote on social media.

His performance is a nod to the policy adopted by the UAE to consolidate the values of inter-faith tolerance, moderation and intercultural exchange, as well as to continue creating channels of communication with all peoples worldwide, regardless of their ethnic, religious and cultural backgrounds. Notably, The UAE is the first country to establish a ministry for tolerance, the Ministry of Tolerance.

The performance will take place at Paul VI Audience Hall on the eve of Christmas, and will air on the fifth Italian Channel as well as several channels around the world.


What We Are Reading Today: American Bonds by Sarah L. Quinn

Updated 26 June 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: American Bonds by Sarah L. Quinn

  • American Bonds examines the evolution of securitization and federal credit programs

Federal housing finance policy and mortgage-backed securities have gained widespread attention in recent years because of the 2008 financial crisis, but issues of government credit have been part of American life since the nation’s founding. 

From the 1780s, when a watershed national land credit policy was established, to the postwar foundations of our current housing finance system, American Bonds examines the evolution of securitization and federal credit programs. Sarah Quinn shows that since the Westward expansion, the US government has used financial markets to manage America’s complex social divides, and politicians and officials across the political spectrum have turned to land sales, home ownership, and credit to provide economic opportunity without the appearance of market intervention or direct wealth redistribution.

Highly technical systems, securitization, and credit programs have been fundamental to how Americans determined what they could and should owe one another. 

Over time, government officials embraced credit as a political tool that allowed them to navigate an increasingly complex and fractured political system, affirming the government’s role as a consequential and creative market participant. Neither intermittent nor marginal, credit programs supported the growth of powerful industries, from railroads and farms to housing and finance; have been used for disaster relief, foreign policy, and military efforts; and were promoters of amortized mortgages, lending abroad, venture capital investment, and mortgage securitization. Illuminating America’s market-heavy social policies, American Bonds illustrates how political institutions became involved in the nation’s lending practices.