MUSE: Life lessons from inspirational women — DaniLeigh

DaniLeigh performing earlier this year. (AFP)
Updated 17 December 2018
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MUSE: Life lessons from inspirational women — DaniLeigh

  • DaniLeigh performed at Sole DXB 2018 as her GCC debut
  • Here she talks adventure, inspirations and being unlucky in love

DUBAI: The Florida-born Dominican singer performs for Puma at Sole DXB on Friday, December 7, in her GCC debut. She first emerged on the scene as a dancer, and directed the “Breakfast Can Wait” video for Prince when she was just 18 years old. Her latest single, “Lil Bebe,” dropped in October and the official video has already racked up nearly 5.5 million views on YouTube. Here she talks adventure, inspirations and being unlucky in love.

I love that music lets me travel the world and see different cultures. And learn more about music. As I started gaining fans, and receiving messages from young girls saying my music changed their lives, that’s just inspired me further.

One of the biggest influences on my life is Tuo Clark, my A&R at (record label) Def Jam. He’s given me confidence as an artist to grow in my songwriting and in my business dealings.

I really admire Drake. I believe he’s so smart as an artist and as a businessman. The way he cultivates with culture and continues to be relevant.

Apart from music, I enjoy adventure. I enjoy being in the water. I enjoy seeing beautiful landscapes. I fine that brings me peace of mind.

Because a lot of people just found out about me, I think they have this misconception that I just popped up out of nowhere. But I’ve been working hard to get to this place in my career since I was 16 years old. I’m really proud of getting the recognition that I feel I deserve, and knowing that my fans react to my music.

Tuo Clark from Def Jam Records. (Getty Images)

Even though my career’s going well, I’ve had the worst luck with my love life. I’ve been in a few relationships and ended up always losing in the end. I deal with it by writing about it in my music though.

I think men need to learn how to value women properly. I believe women are more nurturing and more considerate. Men need to learn that.

I have no regrets. I feel everything I’ve done that might not have been right was always a lesson and helped me grow.

 


Iraqi museum unveils ‘looted’ artefacts

Updated 20 March 2019
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Iraqi museum unveils ‘looted’ artefacts

  • Basra is the most oil-rich province in Iraq but its heritage sites have long been neglected
  • US says it has repatriated more than 3,000 stolen artefacts to Iraq since 2005

BASRA, Iraq: Over 2,000 artefacts, including about 100 that were looted and found abroad, were unveiled Tuesday in a museum in Basra province on the southern tip of Iraq, authorities said.
Basra is the most oil-rich province in Iraq but its heritage sites have long been neglected.
On Tuesday between 2,000 and 2,500 pieces went on display in the Basra Museum, the second largest in Iraq, said Qahtan Al-Obeid, head of archaeology and heritage in the province.
“They date from 6000 BC to 1500 AD,” he told AFP, referring to the Assyrian, Babylonian and Sumerian periods.
Obeid said about 100 artefacts — most of which came from Jordan and the United States — were given back to Iraq to be displayed in the museum, a former palace of deposed dictator Saddam Hussein.
The heritage of Iraq, most of which was former Mesopotamia, has paid a heavy price due to the wars that have ravaged the country for nearly four decades.
Following the US-led invasion that overthrew Saddam in 2003, Daesh group militants destroyed many of the country’s ancient statues and pre-Islamic treasures.
During its occupation of nearly a third of Iraq between 2014 and 2017, Daesh captured much attention by posting videos of its militants destroying statues and heritage sites with sledgehammers and pneumatic drills on the grounds that they are idolatrous.
But experts say they mostly destroyed pieces too large to smuggle and sell off, and kept the smaller pieces, several of which are already resurfacing on the black market in the West.
The United States says it has repatriated more than 3,000 stolen artefacts to Iraq since 2005, including many seized in conflict zones in the Middle East.