UN climate talks in Poland go into overtime

The talks were held at the International Conference Center in Katowice that hosts the UN climate summit COP-24 from Dec. 1 to 14. (File/AFP)
Updated 15 December 2018
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UN climate talks in Poland go into overtime

  • Diplomats and ministers prepared for a closing meeting at noon Saturday, a day past the original deadline
  • The talks are meant to provide a rulebook for all signatories of the 2015 accord

KATOWICE, Poland: Officials from around the world are still working to agree on the fine print of the Paris climate accord after two weeks of talks, even as workers dismantle sections of the conferenced venue around them.
Diplomats and ministers prepared for a closing meeting at noon Saturday, a day past the original deadline, but success was still uncertain.
The UN talks in Katowice, Poland, are meant to provide a rulebook for all signatories of the 2015 accord, ensure financial support for poor countries and send a signal that countries are prepared to increase their efforts in years to come.
The rules for carbon emissions trading remain a key sticking point.
Scientists say emissions of greenhouse gas like carbon dioxide need to drop sharply by 2030 to prevent potentially catastrophic global warming.


Spain charges ‘Wolf Pack’ with another sexual assault

Protesters attend a demonstration, after judges upheld the lesser charge of sexual assault against the five men known as the Manada (Wolf Pack), accused of gang-raping an 18-year-old woman during Pamplona's San Fermin festival, in Madrid, Spain, December 5, 2018. (REUTERS)
Updated 23 January 2019
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Spain charges ‘Wolf Pack’ with another sexual assault

  • Despite the original ruling against them, the men were released on bail in June last year on a legal technicality that says no one can be held for more than two years without a definitive sentence

MADRID: Spanish prosecutors have tabled another sex crime charge against four men calling themselves “The Wolf Pack” who assaulted a young woman at the Pamplona bull-running festival in 2016.
In a controversial ruling, a Spanish court last year gave nine-year prison sentences to the men for sexually assaulting the 18-year-old in a doorway, but cleared them of rape because of a lack of physical violence.
The case gained notoriety amid the global #MeToo movement and brought calls for changes to Spain’s rape law.
In the new case, the Andalusia regional prosecutor’s office said it was seeking a seven-year prison sentence for sexual assault and other crimes suspected to have been committed in Pozoblanco, in southern Spain, two months earlier.
Evidence for that was found against four of the five men in total being investigated over the case at the San Fermin festival in the northern city of Pamplona.
Investigators found a video on the cellphone of one of the accused, in which a woman appeared unconscious while men were abusing her inside a car after a night of partying.
The woman was notified about the video and the new case opened, the prosecutor’s office said.
Despite the original ruling against them, the men were released on bail in June last year on a legal technicality that says no one can be held for more than two years without a definitive sentence.
A rape charge in Spain requires a plaintiff to present evidence of specific violence such as being threatened with a knife or dealt physical blows. The government has said it plans to change the penal code to make rape convictions easier.
The annual bull-running festival in the Navarran capital Pamplona is famed for its drunken revelry. But concern has grown over increased reports of sex attacks and harassment at the event as well mistreatment of women in general in Spain.