Lebanese ‘Capernaum’ shortlisted for an Oscar

Director Nadine Labaki’s film “Capernaum” has been shortlisted for the Best Foreign Film Oscar. (File photo: AFP)
Updated 18 December 2018
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Lebanese ‘Capernaum’ shortlisted for an Oscar

DUBAI: Director Nadine Labaki’s film “Capernaum” has been shortlisted for the Best Foreign Film Oscar, she took to Instagram to announce on Monday.
“What an incredible moment in our film’s journey and a major milestone for Lebanese and Arab cinema... After years of research, tears and sweat, long production hours and sleepless nights, our film has been recognized on this year’s Foreign Language #Oscar shortlist among eight other films from a selection that exceeded 80 submissions from all around the world. We couldn’t be prouder,” she wrote on Instagram.

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#Capharnaum is SHORTLISTED for an #Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film! What an incredible moment in our film’s journey and a major milestone for Lebanese and Arab cinema. After years of research, tears and sweat, long production hours and sleepless nights, our film has been recognized on this year’s Foreign Language #Oscar shortlist among 8 other films from a selection that exceeded 80 submissions from all around the world. We couldn’t be prouder. Thank you @TheAcademy for this immense honor. Thank you @SonyClassics for bringing the film to American audiences and voters. Thank you to each and every member of our cast and crew. And thank you to every audience member who went to see the film at film festivals and in cinemas. #Oscars2019 #Capharnaum

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The other foreign films that “Capernaum” is up against include German “Never Look Away,” Japanese “Shoplifters,” Kazakh “Ayka,” Colombian “Birds of Passage,” Danish “The Guilty, ”Mexican “Roma”, Polish “Cold War” and South Korean “Burning.”


Life lessons from inspirational women — Alexis

Music artist 'Alexis.' (Supplied)
Updated 19 February 2019
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Life lessons from inspirational women — Alexis

  • UAE-based singer-songwriter, Alexis just released her album “This Is Me”
  • She talks tolerance, proving yourself, and the power of words

DUBAI: The UAE-based singer-songwriter, who just released her album “This Is Me,” talks tolerance, proving yourself, and the power of words

I’m very demanding of myself, which is a contradiction, because I’m so understanding and accepting of the weaknesses of other people, but I’m not that kind to myself. But I don’t mind laughing at myself either.

 

I’ve been guilty, earlier in my career, of trying to force situations. Sometimes pushing is good, but allowing things to happen in their own time is also a valuable skill. It’s not necessarily about the destination; it’s the journey. And if you can allow yourself to enjoy the journey, you’ll get there eventually — perhaps in a better condition.

 

My father encouraged me to be an individual thinker. He’s a man who has roots in a very conservative, male-driven culture, but he was raised by a woman who wasn’t afraid to break the mold. He advised me that because of what I look like, and being a woman, I would always need to be more than just adequately prepared: “If you’re required to know two things for a job, when you walk in there you need to know four or six things.”

 

I know it’s probably just something parents tell their kids to help them get through difficult situations, but I think that “Sticks and stones may break your bones but words can never hurt you” thing is such nonsense. Words can hurt. They can cause incredible damage. It’s important for us to realize the impact of what we say, how we say it, and to whom. Words have power.

 

I handled my own business from the very beginning, so I found myself at 18 going into meetings with executives who were in their 40s and 50s. And of course I was a child to them. So having them look beyond the physical thing and realize that I was very serious about my work and knew what I was talking about was a challenge. It’s easy to see me as a fashion horse. It’s harder to see that I’m a worker. Get past the window dressing and I’ve got quality merchandise. But I survived life with older brothers. I think I can tackle anything at this point.

 

Men and women are equally capable, but in different ways. It’s a bit of a generalization, but we have to accept that different people have different methodologies.