FaceOf: Iman Al-Mutairi, Saudi assistant commerce minister

Iman Al-Mutairi
Updated 29 December 2018
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FaceOf: Iman Al-Mutairi, Saudi assistant commerce minister

  • Al-Mutairi also held several posts at Saudi Aramco over the space of more than a decade.
  • Al-Mutairi earned a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from King Faisal University in 1992 and a Ph.D. in bio-organic chemistry from the University of Bristol in 1997. She completed a post-doctoral fellowship in genetics and molecular biology at Harvard Unive

Amid the latest Cabinet reshuffle, Iman Al-Mutairi was appointed assistant commerce minister on Thursday. 

Throughout her career, Al-Mutairi has held a number of academic posts at several universities around the world.

She was a scientific research consultant at PerkinElmer in the US from 2000 to 2003 and assistant professor in human genetics at Harvard University from 1998 to 2000.

Before that, Al-Mutairi was teaching assistant at the University of Bristol in the UK from 1994 to 1997 and at King Faisal University the year before that.

Al-Mutairi also held several posts at Saudi Aramco over the space of more than a decade.

She was preventive medicine adviser at an Aramco hospital from 2003 to 2007, chief of quality control between 2009 and 2011 and workforce administrator the year after that. 

She was manager of the Johns Hopkins-Saudi Aramco Health Care joint venture from 2013 to 2014 and a member of the board of trustees at the Royal University for Women in Bahrain in 2013. 

Al-Mutairi is currently the head of the human capability development program office in the Kingdom, a Vision 2030 flagship program to reform the education and training system. She also leads the 

National Competitiveness Center, which was created by Saudi Arabian General Investment Authority.

Al-Mutairi earned a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from King Faisal University in 1992 and a Ph.D. in bio-organic chemistry from the University of Bristol in 1997. She completed a post-doctoral fellowship in genetics and molecular biology at Harvard University in 2000.


Prince Turki: Purveyors of terror not from one religion

Updated 21 min 36 sec ago
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Prince Turki: Purveyors of terror not from one religion

  • Saudi Arabia’s former diplomat commends Arab News for ‘Preachers of Hate’ project
  • The campaign, in print and online, analyzes the words and deeds of extremist preachers and clerics from all religions and nationalities, places them in context, and explains how they fuel terrorism

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia’s former ambassador to the US and UK, Prince Turki Al-Faisal, has praised the weekly “Preachers of Hate” project that Arab News launched online and in print on Sunday.

“I think this is something that Arab News has stood for since its establishment more than 40 years ago,” he told the newspaper with regard to the project, which highlights extremists from various religions who incite hatred and spread terror worldwide.

“So I congratulate us, as readers of this service that Arab News is providing us. 

“Exposing the purveyors of hate, whoever they may be, is an essential part of combatting terrorism and hate speech. So good luck.”

Prince Turki said the recent terrorist attacks against peaceful worshippers at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, were a “horrific crime” perpetrated by a hateful purveyor of bias and prejudice.

He added that the murderer is a “perfect example of what we’re combatting in the Kingdom. 

“The efforts of the Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Salman, and his Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman, emphasize the need to stand up to these hateful criminals who distort the teachings of religion. 

“Unfortunately, these purveyors of mayhem, destruction and terrorism come from all religious and philosophical backgrounds.”

When asked by Arab News whether Daesh was truly defeated, Prince Turki said: “I don’t know.” 

He added that Saudi Arabia succeeded in combatting Al-Qaeda, yet from that group came Daesh, which he referred to as “fahish,” which means obscene in Arabic.

“Now we see claims of the eradication of fahish. What will follow we will have to wait and see,” he said.

“But if you look at some geographical areas — from the Philippines through to Afghanistan, Indonesia, all the way to North Africa and some of the Sahel countries in Africa — there are still those who are carrying the flag of fahish. 

“So maybe in Syria and Iraq there has been success in removing fahish from the scene, but it exists in other places.”