Jessica Kahawaty ends 2018 with an environmental wake-up call

Updated 30 December 2018
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Jessica Kahawaty ends 2018 with an environmental wake-up call

  • Kahawaty is a keen supporter of a number of humanitarian and environmental causes
  • Kahawaty urged fans to donate a portion of their salaries to end child violence

DUBAI: Lebanese-Australian model and humanitarian Jessica Kahawaty is set to ring in the new year Down Under and took to Instagram this week to share an important message about the environment in one of her last posts of the year.

The influencer took to the social media platform with a photo of herself in a multi-colored, tie-dye shirt — a fashion trend she predicted would make a comeback in 2019 — and captioned it with a note on the state of coral reef ecosystems.

“I love that @pantone announced ‘Living Coral’ as 2019 color of the year,” she said, referring to the Pantone Color Institute’s yearly pick of an annual favorite color. “It’s also an important environmental message calling for attention (to) the state of coral reef ecosystems,” she added.

It is a message that is particularly important in Australia, where the coral along large swathes of the 2,300-kilometer Great Barrier Reef has been killed by rising sea temperatures linked to climate change, leaving behind skeletal remains in a process known as coral bleaching.

The northern reaches of the reef suffered an unprecedented two successive years of severe bleaching in 2016 and 2017, raising fears it may have suffered irreparable damage, AFP reported in November.

And that is why Kahawaty is so pleased that the much-reported-on color of the year is “Living Coral.”

Laurie Pressman, Pantone Color Institute’s vice president, told the Associated Press in December that she considers this saturated orange base with a golden undertone not only warm and welcoming but versatile and life-affirming. It energizes with a softer edge than, say, its pastel and neon color cousins.

“With everything that’s going on today, we’re looking for those humanizing qualities because we’re seeing online life dehumanizing a lot of things,” Pressman said. “We’re looking toward those colors that bring nourishment and the comfort and familiarity that make us feel good. It’s not too heavy. We want to play. We want to be uplifted.”

Kahawaty is a keen supporter of a number of humanitarian and environmental causes, including UNICEF and the United Nations High Commissioner For Refugees (UNHCR)


Last year, fashion house Louis Vuitton selected Kahawaty to work with UNICEF at the Za’atari refugee camp in Jordan to help children affected by the Syrian crisis, which has seen millions of people (including more than two million children) displaced.
Kahawaty also urged fans to donate a minute of their salaries to end child violence as part of the UNICEF Australia initiative, “A Minute of Your Time.”


Saudi Arabia’s East Coast Festival lines up top-class cultural activities

Updated 25 March 2019
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Saudi Arabia’s East Coast Festival lines up top-class cultural activities

  • Dammam Corniche event celebrates Saudi heritage; more ‘seasons’ to come
  • The festival is being held at the waterfront of King Abdullah Park, and access to the 10-day event is free

DAMMAM: People in Saudi Arabia’s Eastern Province have had no shortage of things to do during the Sharqiah Season. From pop concerts featuring international artists to massive sporting events, there is something for everyone among the 83 different events planned.

However, it would be remiss not to celebrate the heritage and culture of the country itself. The Enter East Coast Festival, an open-air marketplace with plenty of activities for locals and tourists to enjoy.

The festival is being held along the Dammam Corniche, at the waterfront of King Abdullah Park, and access to the 10-day event is free.

It features stalls with craftsmen beavering away. At one, a potter is bent over a wheel as he makes vases, lanterns and small toys. At another, carpenters fashion chairs and tables out of planks of wood. A weaver hums as he plaits together palm fronds to form baskets and fans.

The vendors are mostly from Saudi Arabia, but there are other countries showcasing their work too. 

Fishermen and sailors from Oman display pearls still in their shells, delicate replicas of traditional fishing boats, and stretches of fishing net. The stalls from Kuwait feature items from the past and vendors from Bahrain offer local sweets, handmade items and clothing.

There are Saudi dances and musical performances too. One stage, resembling a ship, features performers dressed as sailors singing traditional sea shanties. Another stage has drummers and a singer. A huge area in the middle of the space is allotted to dancers, flag-bearers, and even armed officers participating in a traditional Ardah, or Saudi dance.

Those looking to eat something can chow down on Saudi offerings including jareesh, margoog, or qursan. There are food trucks selling Western fare such as burgers and tacos. 

The festival runs until March 30, when the Sharqiah Season ends. 

The season is a collaborative effort between the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage, the General Entertainment Authority, the General Culture Authority and the General Sports Authority. It is the first of 11 scheduled festivals planned across the country for 2019.

Future seasons will focus on different areas of Saudi Arabia, with different entertainment options for each city, and different parts of the year, such as Ramadan, Eid Al-Fitr and Eid Al-Adha.

Decoder

What is Sharqiah Season?

The festival features more than 80 events in Eastern Province cities, including Dammam, Dhahran, Alkhobar, Al-Ahsa and Jubail. Future seasons will focus on different areas of Saudi Arabia, with different entertainment options for each city. Upcoming seasons will focus on different areas, and also different parts of the year, such as Ramadan, Eid Al-Fitr and Eid Al-Adha. Read our reports on the Sharqiah Season festival here: http://www.arabnews.com/tags/sharqiah-season