Bahrain’s high court upholds five-year sentence against activist

Nabeel Rajab was a leading figure in the 2011 uprising. (File/AFP)
Updated 31 December 2018
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Bahrain’s high court upholds five-year sentence against activist

  • Rajab, a leading figure in the 2011 pro-democracy protests, was sentenced to five years in prison in February
  • He was already serving a two-year term over a news interview in which he said Bahrain tortured political prisoners

DUBAI: Bahrain’s high court upheld a five-year jail sentence against activist Nabeel Rajab on Monday for criticizing Saudi Arabia’s air strikes in Yemen and accusing Bahrain’s prison authorities of torture, his lawyer said.
Rajab, a leading figure in the 2011 pro-democracy protests, was sentenced to five years in prison in February for criticizing the Saudi air strikes and writing tweets accusing authorities of torture.
He was already serving a two-year term over a news interview in which he said Bahrain tortured political prisoners.
“The Court of Cassation rejected the appeal and upheld the sentence of five years in prison against Nabeel Rajab for his tweets,” his lawyer, Mohamed Al Jishi, told Reuters by phone.
The convictions were for “spreading false news and rumors in time of war,” “insulting foreign countries” and “insulting publicly the interior ministry” in comments posted on Twitter, a court document see by Reuters showed.
 


‘Qatar a hospitable base for Muslim Brotherhood,’ says Washington think-tank

Updated 47 min 30 sec ago
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‘Qatar a hospitable base for Muslim Brotherhood,’ says Washington think-tank

  • Qatar’s state-owned news channel Al-Jazeera called out for pushing extremist Islamist ideology, with the Brotherhood playing a “crucial role in programming and setting the editorial line”
  • Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Bahrain and non-GCC member Egypt imposed a diplomatic and economic boycott on Qatar in June 2017 over claims that Doha supports terrorism

DUBAI: Qatar is a hospitable base for the Muslim Brotherhood and many of the world’s most virulent Islamists, a senior member of prominent Washington-based think tank Security Studies Group said in an opinion article published in the Washington Times.

“Qatar has been the Brotherhood’s most hospitable base of operations…Brotherhood Islamism would soon emerge as Qatar’s de-facto state ideology, as the ruling al-Thani family welcomed the Islamists with lavish funding, the highest state honors, and the establishment of new Islamist institutions that would seek to indoctrinate thousands,” the senior vice president for strategic operations, David Reaboi, wrote.

Reaboi also called out Qatar’s state-owned news channel Al-Jazeera for pushing extremist Islamist ideology, with the Brotherhood playing a “crucial role in programming and setting the editorial line.”

“Even as it claims to be a legitimate, journalistic enterprise, Al-Jazeera is an instrument of power projection for the Qatari regime. Its mission has always been to support Qatar and the Brotherhood while attacking its enemies in the United States, Israel, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates,” he said.

“In Arabic, Al Jazeera pushes a stream of vile, anti-Semitic conspiracy theories, and attempts to rile up religious and extremist Muslims against attempts at positive, human rights reforms in Egypt, Saudi Arabia and other Arab states,” he added.

Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Bahrain and non-GCC member Egypt imposed a diplomatic and economic boycott on Qatar in June 2017 over claims that Doha supports terrorism.