Fake News Watch - Sharjah police, Jordanian government and Egyptian military

gypt military colonel Tamer Rifai dismissed reports that an attack targeted a vehicle in North Sinai and urged media outlets to strive for media accuracy. (AFP)
Updated 01 January 2019
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Fake News Watch - Sharjah police, Jordanian government and Egyptian military

LONDON: Arab News examines a weekly round-up of fake news doing the rounds.

1 Sharjah police deny radars destroyed by gunshots
Sharjah police have clarified the truth behind photos showing speed radars destroyed by gunshots that have gone viral on social media. Their response came after images indicating that a number of radars situated on some of the streets outside the emirate were destroyed by gunshots.
Police said on Twitter that the images were from November 2012 and that the perpetrators had been brought to justice.

2 Jordanian government denies increase in bread prices
The Jordanian government denied it planned to increase bread prices in local markets, saying that what is rumored on social media is “incorrect”. The government made its comments through its electronic platform “your right to know.”
Social media users had been sharing that Jordan’s Deputy Prime Minister Rajaei Al-Muasher had threatened to resign unless his request to raise prices was agreed.
“Deputy Prime Minister Rajaei Al-Muasher did not sign his resignation ... and the government has no intention of raising the price of bread,” the government said.

3 Egypt military refutes alleged attack on army vehicle in North Sinai
Egypt military colonel Tamer Rifai dismissed reports that an attack targeted a vehicle in North Sinai and urged media outlets to strive for accuracy while covering military operations.


Netflix to roll out cheaper mobile-only plan for India

Updated 18 July 2019
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Netflix to roll out cheaper mobile-only plan for India

  • India is among the last big growth markets for the company
  • Netflix faces competition from Amazon’s Prime Video and Walt Disney Co’s Hotstar
Netflix said on Wednesday it would roll out a lower-priced mobile-only plan in India within the next three months to tap into a price-sensitive market at a time the streaming company is losing customers in its home turf.
India is among the last big growth markets for the company, where it faces competition from Amazon.com Inc’s Prime Video and Hotstar, a video streaming platform owned by Walt Disney Co’s India unit.
Netflix lost US streaming customers for the first time in eight years on Wednesday, when it posted quarterly results. It also missed targets for new subscribers overseas.
“India is a mobile-first nation, where many first-time users are experiencing the Internet on their phones. In such a scenario, a mobile-only package makes sense to target new users,” said Tarun Pathak, analyst at Counterpoint Research.
The creator of “Stranger Things” and “The Crown” said in March that it was testing a 250-rupee ($3.63) monthly subscription for mobile devices in India, where data plans are among the cheapest in the world.
The country figures prominently in Chief Executive Officer Reed Hastings’ global expansion plans.
“We believe this plan, which will launch in the third quarter, will be an effective way to introduce a larger number of people in India to Netflix and to further expand our business,” the company said in a letter to investors released late on Wednesday.
Netflix currently offers three monthly plans in India, priced between 500 rupees ($7.27) and 800 rupees $11.63).
It has created a niche following in the country by launching local original shows like the thriller “Sacred Games” and dystopian tale “Leila,” which feature popular Bollywood actors.
The second season of “Sacred Games” is set to release in August.
In contrast, Hotstar, which also offers content from AT&T Inc’s HBO and also streams live sports, charges 299 rupees ($4.35) per month. Amazon bundles its video and music streaming services with its Prime membership.
“We’ve been seeing nice steady increases in engagement with our Indian viewers that we think we can keep building on. Growth in that country is a marathon, so we’re in it for the long haul,” Netflix Chief Content Officer Ted Sarandos said.