Arab coalition issues permits for food and fuel ships heading to Yemeni ports

A picture taken on December 24, 2018 shows a view of container cranes at the docks in the port of the Yemeni Red Sea city of Hodeidah. (AFP)
Updated 03 January 2019
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Arab coalition issues permits for food and fuel ships heading to Yemeni ports

  • The Saudi-led coalition pointed out the presence of four ships that have waiting to enter the port of Hodeidah for 12 days
  • The Higher Committee for Relief has revealed that the Houthi militias detained more than 88 aid, commercial and oil vessels

JEDDAH: The Arab coalition issued 10 permits for ships heading to Yemeni ports carrying food and oil, according to Saudi state-news channel Al-Ekhbariya. The coalition pointed out the presence of four ships that have waiting to enter the port of Hodeidah for 12 days.
The Higher Committee for Relief has revealed that the Houthi militias detained more than 88 aid, commercial and oil vessels, and prevented them from entering the ports of Hodeidah and Saleef in western Yemen from May 2015 to December 2018, of which 34 vessels were unloaded after being held by the militias for more than 6 months.

Houthi actions slammed
Yemen’s Minister of Information Muammar Al-Iyrani appreciated World Food Programme’s (WFP) reaction to Houthi militias’ manipulation of food aid.
In a statement to the Yemeni News Agency, Al-Iryani said the WFP’s reaction indicates that the Iranian-backed Houthis are deliberately exacerbating the humanitarian crisis. They are causing people to starve and trying to capitalize on their plight, he said.
“The Houthi militia deliberately deprives millions of Yemenis of salaries, livelihoods and aid from donor countries, increasing their suffering, and pushing many of them to participate in the war, after opening the door of recruitment and joining the fronts as a single option for those who lost their sources of income.”

KSRelief operations
The King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center (KSRelief) recently signed a contract to deliver food aid to displaced people in parts of Yemen.
 The aid package will be distributed among 4,560 beneficiaries in Marib and Saadah governorates.
 KSRelief is carrying out several projects to alleviate the suffering of Yemenis without any discrimination. The relief projects include distribution of food, clothing and shelter among the displaced population.
The center is working on 301 humanitarian projects in different sectors such as health care, education and rehabilitation of war victims and children.

Health care
KSRelief has, so far, provided medical treatment for more than 21,000 injured Yemenis, both inside and outside Yemen.
A total of 6,452 Yemenis received treatment in private sector hospitals in Yemen, while 1,000 received treatment in Yemeni medical centers specializing in eye injuries.
In addition, 12,795 cases were transferred to Saudi Arabia, 534 to Jordan, 280 to Sudan and one to India.
KSRelief provides health services to all Yemeni people in coordination with the Yemeni Higher Relief Committee represented by the Yemeni Ministry of Health and Population, and local and international partners.

Rehabilitation
The center is taking special measures for the rehabilitation of Yemeni children who were forced by the Iranian-backed Houthis to join militias as soldiers.
KSRelief has devised a comprehensive strategy to help these children by providing them with education and arranging recreational activities for their proper mental growth.
It organizes recreational trips for batches of children under its care. As part of its plan to rehabilitate 2,000 of the children recruited by the Houthi militias in Yemen, KSRelief has already rehabilitated 215 children from several Yemeni governorates through previously implemented courses and phases.


Libya protesters demand release of Qaddafi-era spy chief

Former Libyan intelligence chief Abdullah al-Senussi (L), dressed in prison blues, sits along with other defendants behind the bars of the accused cell during a hearing as part of his trial in a courthouse in Tripoli on December 28, 2014. (AFP)
Updated 25 March 2019
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Libya protesters demand release of Qaddafi-era spy chief

  • Senussi was extradited in September 2012 by Mauritania, where he had fled after Qaddafi’s fall
  • Al-Islam was captured and imprisoned by an armed group in the northwestern city of Zintan and sentenced by a Tripoli court in absentia

TRIPOLI: Relatives and supporters of Libya’s Qaddafi-era intelligence chief, jailed for his alleged role in a bloody crackdown during the country’s 2011 uprising, protested in Tripoli on Saturday to demand his release.
Abdullah Al-Senussi, a brother-in-law of longtime dictator Muamar Qaddafi, was sentenced to death in 2015 over the part he allegedly played in the regime’s response to a NATO-backed uprising in 2011 toppled and killed Qaddafi.
Eight others close to Qaddafi, including the Libyan leader’s son, Seif Al-Islam, also received death sentences following a trial condemned by the UN as “seriously” flawed.
Several dozen relatives and members of Senussi’s tribe, the Magerha, gathered in a central Tripoli square to demand he be freed over health concerns.
“The law and medical reports support our legitimate demand,” said one protester, Mohamad Amer.
Officials have not released specific details on his alleged health problems.
In a statement, the Magerha said his liberation would “contribute to and consolidate national reconciliation” in a country torn apart by intercommunal conflicts since Qaddafi’s fall.
The unusual protest comes just over a month after the release on health grounds of Abuzeid Dorda, Qaddafi’s head of foreign intelligence who was sentenced at the same time as Senussi.
The protesters held up photos of Senussi behind bars and placards reading “Freedom to prisoners. Yes to national reconciliation.”
Senussi was extradited in September 2012 by Mauritania, where he had fled after Qaddafi’s fall.
Like the dictator’s son, he had also been the subject of an International Criminal Court arrest warrant for suspected war crimes during the 2011 uprising.
But in an unusual move, in 2013 the court gave Libyan authorities the green light to put him on trial.
He has since been detained in the capital, along with some 40 other senior Qaddafi-era officials including the dictator’s last prime minister Baghdadi Al-Mahmoudi.
Al-Islam was captured and imprisoned by an armed group in the northwestern city of Zintan and sentenced by a Tripoli court in absentia.
The group announced his release in 2017 but it was never confirmed and his fate remains unknown.