Arab coalition issues permits for food and fuel ships heading to Yemeni ports

A picture taken on December 24, 2018 shows a view of container cranes at the docks in the port of the Yemeni Red Sea city of Hodeidah. (AFP)
Updated 03 January 2019
0

Arab coalition issues permits for food and fuel ships heading to Yemeni ports

  • The Saudi-led coalition pointed out the presence of four ships that have waiting to enter the port of Hodeidah for 12 days
  • The Higher Committee for Relief has revealed that the Houthi militias detained more than 88 aid, commercial and oil vessels

JEDDAH: The Arab coalition issued 10 permits for ships heading to Yemeni ports carrying food and oil, according to Saudi state-news channel Al-Ekhbariya. The coalition pointed out the presence of four ships that have waiting to enter the port of Hodeidah for 12 days.
The Higher Committee for Relief has revealed that the Houthi militias detained more than 88 aid, commercial and oil vessels, and prevented them from entering the ports of Hodeidah and Saleef in western Yemen from May 2015 to December 2018, of which 34 vessels were unloaded after being held by the militias for more than 6 months.

Houthi actions slammed
Yemen’s Minister of Information Muammar Al-Iyrani appreciated World Food Programme’s (WFP) reaction to Houthi militias’ manipulation of food aid.
In a statement to the Yemeni News Agency, Al-Iryani said the WFP’s reaction indicates that the Iranian-backed Houthis are deliberately exacerbating the humanitarian crisis. They are causing people to starve and trying to capitalize on their plight, he said.
“The Houthi militia deliberately deprives millions of Yemenis of salaries, livelihoods and aid from donor countries, increasing their suffering, and pushing many of them to participate in the war, after opening the door of recruitment and joining the fronts as a single option for those who lost their sources of income.”

KSRelief operations
The King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center (KSRelief) recently signed a contract to deliver food aid to displaced people in parts of Yemen.
 The aid package will be distributed among 4,560 beneficiaries in Marib and Saadah governorates.
 KSRelief is carrying out several projects to alleviate the suffering of Yemenis without any discrimination. The relief projects include distribution of food, clothing and shelter among the displaced population.
The center is working on 301 humanitarian projects in different sectors such as health care, education and rehabilitation of war victims and children.

Health care
KSRelief has, so far, provided medical treatment for more than 21,000 injured Yemenis, both inside and outside Yemen.
A total of 6,452 Yemenis received treatment in private sector hospitals in Yemen, while 1,000 received treatment in Yemeni medical centers specializing in eye injuries.
In addition, 12,795 cases were transferred to Saudi Arabia, 534 to Jordan, 280 to Sudan and one to India.
KSRelief provides health services to all Yemeni people in coordination with the Yemeni Higher Relief Committee represented by the Yemeni Ministry of Health and Population, and local and international partners.

Rehabilitation
The center is taking special measures for the rehabilitation of Yemeni children who were forced by the Iranian-backed Houthis to join militias as soldiers.
KSRelief has devised a comprehensive strategy to help these children by providing them with education and arranging recreational activities for their proper mental growth.
It organizes recreational trips for batches of children under its care. As part of its plan to rehabilitate 2,000 of the children recruited by the Houthi militias in Yemen, KSRelief has already rehabilitated 215 children from several Yemeni governorates through previously implemented courses and phases.


Syria flare-up kills 35 fighters, including 26 pro-regime forces

Updated 16 June 2019
0

Syria flare-up kills 35 fighters, including 26 pro-regime forces

  • Russian-backed regime forces try to retake villages seized by opposition forces and allied fighters
  • The clashes also left 26 pro-regime forces dead in the north of Hama province

 

BEIRUT: At least 10 civilians and 35 combatants, mostly pro-regime forces, were killed on Saturday in clashes and airstrikes that erupted at dawn in northwestern Syria, a war monitor said.

The flare-up came as Russian-backed regime forces tried to retake two villages seized by opposition forces and allied fighters earlier this month, the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said.

“Since this morning, the Syrian regime and allied fighters have launched five failed attempts to regain control of Jibine and Tal Maleh in northwestern Hama province,” said Observatory head Rami Abdel Rahman.

Syrian regime airstrikes killed nine opposition fighters, the war monitor said.

Ensuing clashes in the north of Hama province left 26 pro-regime forces dead, including eight who were killed in a mine explosion, the Observatory said.

In neighboring Idlib, regime airstrikes killed 10 civilians, including three children, the Observatory said.

The strikes hit the towns of Maaret Al-Numan and Al-Bara as well as the village of Al-Ftira, according to the war monitor.

The Idlib region of some 3 million people is supposed to be protected from a massive regime offensive by a buffer zone deal that Russia and Turkey signed in September.

But it was never fully implemented, as opposition refused to withdraw from a planned demilitarized zone.

In January, the Hayat Tahrir Al-Sham alliance led by Syria’s former Al-Qaeda affiliate extended its administrative control over the region, which includes most of Idlib province as well as adjacent slivers of Latakia, Hama and Aleppo provinces.

The Syrian regime and Russia have upped their bombardment of the region since late April, killing nearly 400 civilians, according to the Observatory.

Turkey said on Friday that it did not accept Russia’s “excuse” that it had no ability to stop the Syrian regime’s continued bombardments in the last opposition bastion of Idlib.

“In Syria, who are the regime’s guarantors? Russia and Iran,” Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu told state news agency Anadolu in a televised interview.

“Thus we do not accept the excuse that ‘We cannot make the regime listen to us’,” he said.

His comments came as Turkey disagreed with Russia earlier this week after Moscow claimed a new cease-fire had been secured in the province following weeks of regime bombardments — a claim that was denied by Ankara.

Syria’s war has killed more than 370,000 people and displaced millions since it started in 2011 with the repression of anti-regime protests.

Russia launched a military intervention in support of the regime in 2015, helping its forces reclaim large parts of the country from opposition fighters and militants.