What We Are Reading Today: The Winding Road to the Welfare State

Updated 03 January 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: The Winding Road to the Welfare State

Author: George R. Boyer

How did Britain transform itself from a nation of workhouses to one that became a model for the modern welfare state?
The Winding Road to the Welfare State investigates the evolution of living standards and welfare policies in Britain from the 1830s to 1950 and provides insights into how British working-class households coped with economic insecurity, according to a review on the Princeton University Press website.
George Boyer examines the retrenchment in Victorian poor relief, the Liberal Welfare Reforms, and the beginnings of the postwar welfare state, and he describes how workers altered spending and saving methods based on changing government policies.
From the cutting back of the Poor Law after 1834 to Parliament’s abrupt about-face in 1906 with the adoption of the Liberal Welfare Reforms, Boyer offers new explanations for oscillations in Britain’s social policies and how these shaped worker well-being.


What We Are Reading Today: Grace Will Lead Us Home

Updated 21 July 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Grace Will Lead Us Home

Author: Jennifer Berry Hawes

Grace Will Lead Us Home is a deeply moving work of narrative nonfiction on the tragic shootings in 2015 at the Mother Emanuel AME church in Charleston, South Carolina.
Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jennifer Berry Hawes provides a definitive account of the tragedy’s aftermath.
“With unprecedented access to the grieving families and other key figures, Hawes offers a nuanced and moving portrait of the events and emotions that emerged in the massacre’s wake,” said a review in goodreads.com.
It said “Grace Will Lead Us Home — an unforgettable and deeply human portrait of grief, faith, and forgiveness — is destined to be a classic in the finest tradition of journalism.”
Chris Lebron said in a review for The New York Times: “In Grace Will Lead Us Home, the sorrow of the massacre’s three survivors, and that of the relatives left to mourn the dead, is vividly rendered but not to the point of caricature. Similarly admirable are moments when she depicts the difficulties faced by Roof’s family without compelling us to feel for them what we feel for the victims and their relatives.”