Critical thinking and philosophy to be taught in Saudi schools

The program aims to boost students’ conference. (AFP)
Updated 05 January 2019
0

Critical thinking and philosophy to be taught in Saudi schools

  • The Vision 2030 reform plan says education should be developed to focus on pupils not teachers, inculcate skills, improve confidence and promote a spirit of creativeness

Critical thinking and philosophy are to be taught at Saudi schools from this year, following a decision by the Education Ministry to revamp the curriculum for the 21st century.
Dr. Ahmed Al-Issa, former education minister, recently inaugurated a program that aims to improve independent thinking by encouraging questions and creating an environment conducive to respecting different viewpoints. The program also aims to boost student confidence.
Al-Issa said the course would be part of the “Life Skills” curriculum currently being taught until it became an independent course.
It had taken time and effort to introduce the new subjects and an international team had been brought in to work alongside local specialists, he added.
The next steps would be introducing school subjects on the law and financial literacy, he said.
A spokesman for the Education Ministry, Mubarak Al-Osaimi, said the subjects were in line with the Vision 2030 reform plan.
Critical thinking and problem solving were important skills and it was important for young people to master them to help with personal development, he added.
Information on the course would be available to students, their families, teachers and trainees in the form of textbooks and handbooks used in more than 60 countries worldwide, he told Arab News.
Al-Osaimi also said the ministry had provided every kind of support to scholarship students for university admissions and improving scholarship procedures.

Creativeness
The Vision 2030 reform plan says education should be developed to focus on pupils not teachers, inculcate skills, improve confidence and promote a spirit of creativeness.
Saudi Arabia has pledged to raise its literacy rate from 94.4 percent to 100 percent in the near future. The Kingdom leads many Arab and Asian countries in achieving literacy targets.
Last month, Sabya Directorate of Education in Jazan inaugurated the first virtual school for students with special needs.
The assistant director of education in Sabya governorate, Hanan bint Ali Al-Hazimi, inaugurated the school.
Al-Hazimi said the virtual school was important due to the hardships faced by students with special needs.
She said the virtual school aims to provide an opportunity to all those students who are otherwise unable to continue their studies.


Riyadh, Beirut stress need to confront Islamic extremism

Updated 6 min 35 sec ago
0

Riyadh, Beirut stress need to confront Islamic extremism

  • Saudi-Lebanese Parliamentary Friendship Committee reaffirms the importance of restoring peace and harmony among all Arab countries

BEIRUT: A delegation from the Saudi Shoura Council, headed by Saleh bin Manea Al-Khalewi, began an official visit to Lebanon on Tuesday, meeting President Michel Aoun and Prime Minister Saad Hariri.

It is the first visit of the council to Lebanon, to convene the first meeting of the Saudi-Lebanese Parliamentary Friendship Committee, headed by Tammam Salam.

Aoun praised “the fraternal relations between Lebanon and Saudi Arabia,” and reaffirmed “the paramount importance of restoring peace and harmony among all Arab countries, for the benefit of all,” wishing to establish “peace on solid foundations based on the principle of respect for the vital interests of every country.”

He underlined that political differences should not allow deviation from the principles of the Arab League charter, and hailed Saudi Arabia’s recent decision to lift the ban on its citizens traveling to Lebanon in time for the summer season, hoping that the “Kingdom witnesses further success and growth.

“Lebanon is more than ready to cooperate in all areas to achieve this end, especially in the presence of an important Lebanese community in the Kingdom that contributed to its prosperity,” he added.

Al-Khalewi underscored the “historic relations between the two countries and the two brotherly peoples,” emphasizing the importance of the ongoing support provided by the Kingdom to Lebanon. He also praised Aoun’s keenness to build Arab solidarity and consensus.

The committee discussed means of developing cooperation in legislative sectors in the two countries, serving the goal of greater Arab solidarity. Delegates agreed on the need for stability and peace in Arab countries, and the need to confront Islamic extremism leading to domestic and international acts of terrorism.