UN council regrets Somalia’s decision to expel envoy

Nicholas Haysom, a South African lawyer and experienced diplomat, was ordered to leave after he questioned the government’s arrest of an Al-Shabab defector who ran for election. (AP)
Updated 06 January 2019
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UN council regrets Somalia’s decision to expel envoy

  • UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres agreed to appoint a new UN envoy to replace Nicholas Haysom
  • The UN mission in Somalia is tasked with supporting peace efforts and the strengthening of government institutions

UNITED NATIONS: The UN Security Council on Saturday expressed regret after Somalia expelled a UN envoy but added that it expected “full cooperation” between Somalia and the United Nations.
The council released the unanimous statement after UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres on Friday agreed to appoint a new UN envoy to replace Nicholas Haysom, who was declared persona non grata by the Mogadishu government on January 1.
Haysom, a South African lawyer and experienced diplomat, was ordered to leave after he questioned the government’s arrest of an Al-Shabab defector who ran for election.
The British-drafted statement expressed “regret” for the decision and expressed full support for the UN mission to Somalia.
Council members reiterated “their expectation of full cooperation between Somalia and the United Nations,” it added.
The council met behind closed doors on Friday to discuss a response to Somalia’s decision but China asked for more time to consider the text, diplomats said.
China presented amendments on Saturday to stress that the council respects Somalia’s “sovereignty, territorial integrity, political independence and unity,” diplomats said.
The council statement said 2019 will be a “critical year for Somalia” and called on its leaders “to work together to advance political and security reforms.”
On Friday, Guterres’ spokesman said the UN chief “deeply regrets” the decision to expel Haysom but that he nevertheless intends to appoint a new envoy.
Guterres spoke twice by phone with President Mohamed Abdullahi Mohamed to urge him to reverse the decision but the Somali president told him on Friday that Haysom would not be welcomed back, diplomats said.
Haysom, who took up the post of UN envoy in October, warned the council during a meeting on Thursday of a risk of conflict during elections in Somalia’s federal states due to tensions with the central authorities.
The arrest of Muktar Robow could discourage other Al-Shabab militants “who may be considering exchanging violence for a political path,” said Haysom.
Robow, who defected from the Islamist Al-Shabab group in 2017, was arrested last month and flown to the capital Mogadishu after announcing his bid for the state presidency in South West State.
The arrest sparked protests in the southwestern town of Baidoa on December 13-15 that were violently suppressed by Somalia’s security forces, leaving at least 15 dead.
In a letter sent to the government, Haysom requested an investigation of the protest violence and information on the legal basis for arresting Robow.
The UN mission in Somalia is tasked with supporting peace efforts and the strengthening of government institutions in the Horn of Africa nation, which were ruined by decades of civil war.


One third of UN workers say sexually harassed in past two years

Updated 29 min 59 sec ago
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One third of UN workers say sexually harassed in past two years

  • The online survey was completed by 30,364 people from the United Nations and its agencies
  • More than half of those experienced sexual harassment said it happened in an office environment

UNITED NATIONS: One third of UN staff and contractors experienced sexual harassment in the past two years, according to a report released by the United Nations on Tuesday.
The online survey, carried out by Deloitte in November, was completed by 30,364 people from the United Nations and its agencies — just 17 percent of those eligible. In a letter to staff, Secretary-General Antonio Guterres described the response rate as “moderately low.”
“This tells me two things: first — that we still have a long way to go before we are able to fully and openly discuss sexual harassment; and second — that there may also be an ongoing sense of mistrust, perceptions of inaction and lack of accountability,” he wrote.
The survey comes amid the wider “Me Too” movement around the world against sexual harassment and assault.
According to the report, 21.7 percent of respondents said they were subjected to sexual stories or offensive jokes, 14.2 percent received offensive remarks about their appearance, body or sexual activities and 13 percent were targeted by unwelcome attempts to draw them into a discussion on sexual matters.
Some 10.9 percent said they were subjected to gestures or use of body language of a sexual nature, which embarrassed or offended them, and 10.1 percent were touched in way that made them feel uncomfortable.
More than half of those experienced sexual harassment said it happened in an office environment, while 17.1 percent said it happened at a work-related social event. Two out of three harassers were male, according to the survey.
Only one in three people said they took action after experiencing sexual harassment.
Guterres said the report contained “some sobering statistics and evidence of what needs to change to make a harassment-free workplace real for all of us.”
“As an organization founded on equality, dignity and human rights, we must lead by example and set the standard,” he said.
The United Nations has tried to increase transparency and strengthen how it deals with such accusations over the past few years after a string of sexual exploitation and abuse accusations against UN peacekeepers in Africa.
The head of the UN agency for HIV and AIDS is also stepping down in June, six months before his term ends, after an independent panel said that his “defective leadership” tolerated “a culture of harassment, including sexual harassment, bullying, and abuse of power.”