New York Knicks player Enes Kanter will not travel to London over assassination fears

NBA star Enes Kanter said Friday he will not be travelling to London for the New York Knicks' game there because he fears he might be assassinated for his opposition to Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. (Getty Images/AFP)
Updated 06 January 2019
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New York Knicks player Enes Kanter will not travel to London over assassination fears

LONDON: NBA star Enes Kanter said Friday he will not be travelling to London for the New York Knicks' game there because he fears he might be assassinated for his opposition to Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan.
Kanter disclosed his plans to stay in New York rather than travel with the Knicks to London on Jan. 17, the Independent reported. The Knicks later said Kanter also would not make the trip because of a visa issue.
He added that he cannot travel anywhere except the United States and Canada because “there’s a chance I could get killed out there.”


“Sadly, I'm not going because of that freaking lunatic, the Turkish president,” Kanter said. “It’s pretty sad that all the stuff affects my career and basketball, because I want to be out there and help my team win.”
Kanter said it would be “easy” for an attempt on his life to be made in London as “they've got a lot of spies there.”
NBA star Kanter is a Turkish native and critic of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. He was detained in Romania when he travelled overseas in May 2017.
His Turkish passport was cancelled in 2017, which he said was because of his political views.
Kanter is a follower of US-based Turkish cleric Fethullah Gulen who is accused by Turkey's government of masterminding a failed military coup in 2016.
The NBA star’s father, Mehmet, was indicted last year and charged with "membership in a terror group." He lost his job after the failed military coup even though he publicly disavowed his son and his beliefs.


Official count shows Widodo reelected as Indonesian leader

Updated 36 min 23 sec ago
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Official count shows Widodo reelected as Indonesian leader

  • Widodo’s challenger for a second time, former general Prabowo Subianto, has refused to accept defeat and declared himself the winner last month
  • Police this month have arrested 31 Islamic militants they say planned to set off bombs during expected street protests against the election result
JAKARTA, Indonesia: The official count from last month’s Indonesian presidential election shows President Joko Widodo won 55.5% of the vote, the Election Commission said Tuesday, securing him a second term.
The formal result from the April 17 election was almost the same as the preliminary “quick count” results drawn from a sample of polling stations on election day.
Widodo’s challenger for a second time, former general Prabowo Subianto, has refused to accept defeat and declared himself the winner last month.
Thousands of police and soldiers are on high alert in the capital Jakarta, anticipating protests from Subianto’s supporters.
Subianto has alleged massive election fraud in the world’s third-largest democracy but hasn’t provided any credible evidence. Votes are counted publicly and the commission posts the tabulation form from each polling station on its website, allowing for independent verification.
Counting was completed just before midnight and the Election Commission announced the results early Tuesday before official witnesses from both campaigns.
“We reject the results of the presidential election,” said Azis Subekti, one of the witnesses for Subianto. “This refusal is a moral responsibility for us to not give up the fight against injustice, fraud, arbitrariness, lies, and any actions that will harm democracy.”
Under Indonesia’s election law, Subianto can dispute the results at the Constitutional Court.
He and members of his campaign team have said they will mobilize “people power” for days of street protests rather than appeal to the court because they don’t believe it will provide justice.
In a video released after results were announced, Subianto again refused to concede defeat but called on supporters to refrain from violence.
Police this month have arrested 31 Islamic militants they say planned to set off bombs during expected street protests against the election result.