Laws to help disabled ‘needed urgently,’ Arab conference told

1 / 2
Saudi Arabian representatives presented two working papers at the conference. (SPA)
2 / 2
Saudi Arabian representatives presented two working papers at the conference. (SPA)
Updated 07 January 2019
0

Laws to help disabled ‘needed urgently,’ Arab conference told

  • Saudi Arabia presents two papers on people with special needs

JEDDAH: The rising number of armed conflicts in many Arab states highlighted the urgent need to create protective laws for the disabled, an international conference in Cairo was told.
Dr. Nasriya Baghdadi, director of civil society organizations in the Arab League, said that violent conflicts were hindering Arab states’ abilities to absorb growing numbers of people with special needs.
Intervention operations were also harder, in addition to the challenges facing less-developed countries, she said.
Baghdadi’s comments came during her opening address at the first international conference on support, education and care for people with disabilities in Arab countries.
The event started on Sunday and was organized by the League of Arab States.
Baghdadi’s address focused on creative initiatives aimed at integrating disabled people in political, cultural and social life.
“Arab leaders committed themselves to the 2030 Agenda on Sustainable Development during the Arab Summit held in Mauritania in 2016, where independent and effective goals related to people with special needs were added,” she said.
The league had launched the Arab guiding law for protection of the disabled, she said, adding that “many Arab countries implemented the initiative’s articles.”
Saudi Arabian representatives presented two working papers at the conference.
Jassem Mohammed Al-Mutairi, the conference secretary-general, delivered a paper titled “Entrepreneurship and its relationship with people with special needs,” while Ahmed Mohammed Al-Saadi, president of the Saudi Family Guidance Forum, discussed “The role of families in developing the talents of disabled people.”
Mohammad Abo Adela, chairman of the Jordanian Al-Ezwa Association for Social Development, told the forum that “the integration process of people with special needs in Arab societies is still modest. People still see disability as a problem for the families of disabled individuals only.”


Website launched to support housing project in Saudi Arabia

The Ministry of Commerce and the Ministry of Housing are working together to provide the necessary services for citizens from different social classes. (SPA)
Updated 30 min 9 sec ago
0

Website launched to support housing project in Saudi Arabia

  • Real estate financing for January hit SR4.7 billion, and coming months were expected to see even bigger figures, Al-Hogail told Reuters news agency on the sidelines of a housing conference in Riyadh

RIYADH: A new website has been set up to support a housing project for 10,000 units in the Kingdom.
Housing Minister Majid Al-Hogail, and Commerce and Investment Minister Majid Al-Qassabi on Sunday launched Benaa Housing, which will help construction companies and contractors contribute to a development program in the Kingdom.
Benaa Housing aims to speed up the process of building 10,000 housing units in various parts of Saudi Arabia by enabling small and medium enterprises in the construction sector to access and contribute to projects and opportunities. The estimated cost of the project is SR3.5 billion ($910 million).
“The Ministry of Housing is always keen to provide adequate housing, solutions, and services suitable to all families, especially the beneficiaries of the Housing Development Program in all regions of the Kingdom,” Al-Hogail said.
Al-Qassabi said the new platform would generate more business opportunities for small and medium enterprises and provide suitable apartments for middle-class and lower-income families.
“The Ministry of Commerce and the Ministry of Housing are working together to provide the necessary services for citizens from different social classes and groups, and the new platform is the fruit of these efforts,” he added.
Earlier this month, the housing minister said he expected investments in the real estate financing sector to reach between SR60 billion and SR80 billion this year.
Real estate financing for January hit SR4.7 billion, and coming months were expected to see even bigger figures, Al-Hogail told Reuters news agency on the sidelines of a housing conference in Riyadh.
Saudi home ownership was growing between 6 and 7 percent annually, he said, adding that he hoped to raise home ownership to 15,000 new households per month by 2020, from a little over 10,000 per month now.
The ministry aims to increase housing ownership through policy and stimulating the private sector, according to its website.
The challenges facing the ministry are the limited availability of suitable units for all parts of the population; difficulty in accessing adequate housing finance; the inefficiency of the real estate sector and heavy reliance on government funding.
“Even though 47 percent of Saudi families already own their homes, we aim to increase this rate by 5 percentage points by 2020,” the Kingdom’s Vision 2030 reform plan states. Vision 2030 also aims to speed up construction and provide Saudis with high-quality, competitively priced housing, and to stimulate localization of the country’s construction industry.