Laws to help disabled ‘needed urgently,’ Arab conference told

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Saudi Arabian representatives presented two working papers at the conference. (SPA)
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Saudi Arabian representatives presented two working papers at the conference. (SPA)
Updated 07 January 2019

Laws to help disabled ‘needed urgently,’ Arab conference told

  • Saudi Arabia presents two papers on people with special needs

JEDDAH: The rising number of armed conflicts in many Arab states highlighted the urgent need to create protective laws for the disabled, an international conference in Cairo was told.
Dr. Nasriya Baghdadi, director of civil society organizations in the Arab League, said that violent conflicts were hindering Arab states’ abilities to absorb growing numbers of people with special needs.
Intervention operations were also harder, in addition to the challenges facing less-developed countries, she said.
Baghdadi’s comments came during her opening address at the first international conference on support, education and care for people with disabilities in Arab countries.
The event started on Sunday and was organized by the League of Arab States.
Baghdadi’s address focused on creative initiatives aimed at integrating disabled people in political, cultural and social life.
“Arab leaders committed themselves to the 2030 Agenda on Sustainable Development during the Arab Summit held in Mauritania in 2016, where independent and effective goals related to people with special needs were added,” she said.
The league had launched the Arab guiding law for protection of the disabled, she said, adding that “many Arab countries implemented the initiative’s articles.”
Saudi Arabian representatives presented two working papers at the conference.
Jassem Mohammed Al-Mutairi, the conference secretary-general, delivered a paper titled “Entrepreneurship and its relationship with people with special needs,” while Ahmed Mohammed Al-Saadi, president of the Saudi Family Guidance Forum, discussed “The role of families in developing the talents of disabled people.”
Mohammad Abo Adela, chairman of the Jordanian Al-Ezwa Association for Social Development, told the forum that “the integration process of people with special needs in Arab societies is still modest. People still see disability as a problem for the families of disabled individuals only.”


Madinah museum showcases over 2,000 rare artifacts

Updated 23 August 2019

Madinah museum showcases over 2,000 rare artifacts

  • The museum has issued more than 44 books and publications on Madinah’s architecture

MADINAH: Dar Al-Madinah Museum offers visitors the opportunity to view historical pieces associated with the Prophet’s life. It features artifacts that capture the history, heritage, social life and culture of Madinah.

The museum’s executive director, Hassan Taher, said that it aims to promote the noble values of the Prophet Muhammad, encourage a sense of belonging and capture the history, culture and heritage of Madinah. The exhibits start with the Prophet’s life and end with the Saudi era.

Taher said: “The museum carries out specialized research in Madinah’s architectural heritage. It contains a library of relevant books, research and magazines, all of which are accessible to researchers.”

He said that the museum has issued more than 44 books and publications on Madinah’s architecture.

Taher explained that when preparing the museum’s narrative, it was necessary to reconcile temporal and spatial contexts so they created an added moral and intellectual value for the visitor.

He added: “There are around 2,000 artifacts in the museum’s exhibition halls. These include antiquities, extremely accurate models, handicrafts, manuscripts, documents, correspondence, old publications, postage stamps, photographs and artworks.”

One of the museum’s most valuable exhibits is a large collection of rare pieces associated with important moments in the Prophet’s life and the history of Madinah. 

These include various parts of the Kaaba, rare coins used in Madinah during different eras, ancient pottery, Islamic manuscripts, jewelry and collectibles from the pre-Islamic era.

Taher said that the museum has a professional team of guides who speak several languages, including English, Turkish, Urdu and Malay.