Houthis destroy relief aid depots in Hodeidah

The humanitarian situation in the country has affected up to 12 million Yemenis. (AFP)
Updated 08 January 2019
0

Houthis destroy relief aid depots in Hodeidah

  • The militia deliberately attacked the storage depots to cover up their looting activities
  • Dr. Abdulraqeeb Fath said the Houthis were responsible for the worsening humanitarian condition

DUBAI: The Houthi militia has bombed storehouses of relief organizations in Hodeidah, which contained food and basic goods to be distributed to the Yemeni people, UAE state news agency WAM has reported.

The militia deliberately attacked these storage depots, located 7 kilometers east of Hodeidah, to hide their raids in which they looted humanitarian aid intended for Yemenis, local eyewitnesses said.

Dr. Abdulraqeeb Fath, the Yemeni Minister of Local Administration and the Chairman of the High Committee for Relief in Yemen, said the Houthis were responsible for the worsening humanitarian conditions in the country and that they sold the stolen items for profit.

The United Nations World Food Programme (UNWFP) supported the accusations, and accused the Houthis of disrupting the distribution of humanitarian support in the conflict-ridden country.

The disruption was tantamount to stealing food from the mouths of the hungry, UNWFP Executive Director David Paisley said, and called for a stop in these practices.


Archaeologists find mosque from when Islam arrived in holy land

Updated 18 July 2019
0

Archaeologists find mosque from when Islam arrived in holy land

  • Authorities estimate the mosquer dates back to the 7th to 8th centuries
  • Rare to find house of prayer so ancient whose congregation is likely to have been local farmers

RAHAT, Israel: Archaeologists in Israel have discovered the remains of one of the world’s oldest rural mosques, built around the time Islam arrived in the holy land, they said on Thursday.
The Israel Antiquities Authority estimates that the mosque, uncovered ahead of new construction in the Bedouin town of Rahat in the Negev desert, dates back to the 7th to 8th centuries.
There are large mosques known to be from that period in Jerusalem and in Makkah but it is rare to find a house of prayer so ancient whose congregation is likely to have been local farmers, the antiquities authority said.
Excavated at the site were the remains of an open-air mosque — a rectangular building, about the size of a single-car garage, with a prayer niche facing south toward Makkah.
“This is one of the earliest mosques known from the beginning of the arrival of Islam in Israel, after the Arab conquest of 636 C.E.,” said Gideon Avni of the antiquities authority.
“The discovery of the village and the mosque in its vicinity are a significant contribution to the study of the history of the country during this turbulent period.”