No more than 1 wife: Israel looks to tackle Bedouin polygamy

Around 20 to 30 percent of Bedouin men practice polygamy, according to government figures. (File/AFP)
Updated 09 January 2019
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No more than 1 wife: Israel looks to tackle Bedouin polygamy

  • For the first time, suspected Bedouin polygamists are being prosecuted
  • Many Bedouins see only a ploy to curb their population growth

LAKIYA: Israel has begun cracking down on polygamy among the country’s Bedouins, after decades of turning a blind eye to the old custom that remains widespread in the community.
For the first time, suspected Bedouin polygamists are being prosecuted.
But many Bedouins, who complain of systematic neglect and discrimination by successive Israeli governments, see only a ploy to curb their population growth and criminalize their community members.
Israeli Justice Ministry’s Emi Palmor, who spearheads the campaign, says she’s determined to enforce the law but is trying to do so with input from the community. She said she has spent two years researching the issue.
Around 20 to 30 percent of Bedouin men practice polygamy, according to government figures, with the rate climbing as high as 60 percent in some villages.


Amputee Sumatran tiger gives birth to cubs

Updated 23 min 59 sec ago
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Amputee Sumatran tiger gives birth to cubs

  • The gender of the two cubs is yet to be determined
  • There are less than 400 Sumartan tigers remaining in the wild as they are losing their habitats to deforestation
PADANG-LAWAS, Indonesia: A Sumatran tiger with an amputated paw has given birth to a pair of cubs in Indonesia, amid fears for the future of the critically endangered species.
Gadis — whose name means girl in Indonesian — delivered her babies at the Padang Lawas conservation area in North Sumatra about a month ago, conservationists say.
The tiger mom has been undergoing rehabilitation since her paw and part of her leg were amputated two years ago after getting caught in a trap for catching wild boars.
“Gadis... has now recovered and is healthy, giving birth to the two cubs,” said reserve head Parta Basmeli Siregar.
The sex of the two cubs has not yet been established, he added.
Sumatran tiger births are rare and the species is considered critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.
There are fewer than 400 left in the wild and environmental activists say they are increasingly coming into conflict with people as their natural habitat is rapidly deforested.