Chapo’s secret messages to his wife and lover revealed

Emma Coronel Aispuro, the wife of Joaquin Guzman, the Mexican drug lord known as "El Chapo", arrives at the Brooklyn Federal Courthouse, for the trial of Guzman in the Brooklyn borough of New York, US, January 9, 2019. (REUTERS)
Updated 10 January 2019
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Chapo’s secret messages to his wife and lover revealed

  • Guzman, whose trial began two months ago, faces life in prison if convicted of smuggling 155 tons of drugs into the United States as the head of the Sinaloa cartel

NEW YORK: Prosecutors trying Joaquin “Chapo” Guzman opened an extraordinary window Wednesday into the intimate life of the Mexican drug lord as he plotted crime deals with his wife and a lover while doting on his twin daughters.
Jealous and paranoid, Guzman spied on both his beauty queen wife, Emma Coronel, and the lover, Agustina Cabanillas Acosta, using a surveillance system installed in the encrypted Blackberries he gave them.
The FBI, it turns out, also had access to his communications, after recruiting the computer expert who installed the FlexiSpy surveillance system.
Read out in court, text messages between Guzman and the two women recorded them discussing major cocaine shipments but also more mundane things, like the kids.
“Our Kiki is fearless,” Chapo jokes to his wife in one message in January 2012, referring to one of their twin daughters, Maria Joaquina, now seven. “I’m going to give her an AK-47 so she can hang with me.”
The 29-year-old Coronel, who married Guzman while still an adolescent, was in court as the messages were read out.
She listened with a serious expression, avoiding eye contact with anyone but her 61-year-old husband, who waved to her several times during the proceedings.

Chapo’s nickname for his wife was “Reinita Coronel,” or “RC” and the girls were “reinitas,” or little queens in Spanish.
The couple discuss the children, a $12,000 watch he gave her that she wanted to return, and a drug shipment across the border that Coronel’s father is involved in. She also asks him for money for plastic surgery.
Guzman, whose trial began two months ago, faces life in prison if convicted of smuggling 155 tons of drugs into the United States as the head of the Sinaloa cartel.
He was extradited to the United States nearly two years ago after twice escaping from prison in Mexico.
While on the run, he was nearly captured in Los Cabos, a Mexican resort town, on February 22, 2012, escaping minutes ahead of the police.
The same day he sent a text to Emma, asking her to quickly send him two pair of black shoes, jeans, shampoo — and “black ink for the moustache.”
Although Guzman escaped, three others were captured, including Cabanillas, his lover and partner in crime who was known as “Fiera,” Spanish for Wild Beast.
The text messages read out in court suggest she was particularly close to him.
They discuss the formation of two companies — a chemical fertilizer business in German and citrus firm in Ecuador — with the aim of exporting drugs to “Europe, Canada, Australia and also the United States.” In another exchange they talk about buying between 630 and 700 tons of cocaine in Belize.
They address each other as “Love” in the texts. The evidence shows she had liposuction performed at his expense.
“I adore you,” Guzman tells her. “You are the most important person to me.”
But in a text to a friend, Cabanillas dismisses Guzman as an “idiot.”
“I don’t trust these BlackBerries, the ones he gives me over here, because the bastard can locate me.”


Indonesia palm oil growers threaten retaliation over EU ‘intimidation’

Updated 57 min 34 sec ago
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Indonesia palm oil growers threaten retaliation over EU ‘intimidation’

  • Earlier this week, Coordinating Minister for Maritime Affairs, Luhut Binsar Pandjaitan, warned that if the EU implements a ban on palm oil imports, Indonesia would retaliate strongly with possible bans on European products
  • Indonesia and Malaysia together produce about 85 percent of the world’s palm oil

JAKARTA: Biofuel producers in Indonesia called on the Indonesian government and EU to find a “win-win solution” to a dispute over legislation that will phase out palm oil manufacturing in the region, risking jobs and billions of dollars in revenue.
Earlier this week, Coordinating Minister for Maritime Affairs, Luhut Binsar Pandjaitan, warned that if the EU implements a ban on palm oil imports, Indonesia would retaliate strongly with possible bans on European products, including passengers jets, train coaches, and motor vehicles.
“We want a win-win solution. Retaliation is not a favorable option but, eventually, what else can we do? It could become necessary if we keep being intimidated,” said Master Parulian Tumanggor, chairman of the Indonesia’s Biodiesel Producers Association.
“If they stop biofuel, millions (of workers and farmers) will become unemployed. We don’t want that,” he added.
Pandjaitan said that with Indonesia’s aviation industry expected to expand threefold by 2034, the country will require about 2,500 aircraft in the next two decades — a big market for European companies.
Aircraft demand from Indonesia is worth more than $40 billion and it will create millions of jobs.
“It’s a matter of survival. If they treat us like this, we will retaliate strongly. We are not a poor country, we are a developing country and we have a big potential,” Pandjaitan said in a briefing with the EU ambassador to Indonesia, Vincent Guerend, and European investors.
Darmin Nasution, chief economic minister, said Indonesia is considering a challenge to the EU legislation via the World Trade Organization, and will seek support from the Council of Palm Oil Producing Countries and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations.
Indonesia and Malaysia together produce about 85 percent of the world’s palm oil.
Foreign Minister Retno Marsudi spoke with her Malaysian counterpart, Saifuddin Abdullah, on the sidelines of Organization of Islamic Cooperation emergency meeting in Istanbul on Friday.
“We agreed to work together to fight against discrimination of palm oil in the EU,” she said via Twitter.
Nasution said palm oil contributed $17.89 billion to Indonesia’s economy in 2018 and almost 20 million workers depended on the plantations for their livelihood.
On March 13 the European Commission adopted new rules on biofuels based on sustainability criteria with a two-month scrutiny period. The EU said “best available scientific data” show palm oil plantations are a major cause of deforestation and climate change.
Palm oil plantations in Indonesia have resulted in massive deforestation on the islands of Sumatra and Kalimantan.
Guerend acknowledged the importance of palm oil to Indonesia in terms of jobs, but said that there was some flexibility in the regulation.
“It will be further modified in a few years’ time. It’s not cast in stone forever as the industry is dynamic, expanding, and reforming, and we take that into account,” he said.
“Our invitation for everyone is to work on sustainability because it’s in everybody’s interest,” he added.